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Re: when is the best time to transplant a fig bush (about 6 feet high)

Re: when is the best time to transplant a fig bush (about 6 feet high)
Posted by: Newt (IP Logged)
Date: October 20, 2008 22:33


Hi Lynn,

Some things you should know about figs. From this site, of which the bold is mine:
[www.nafex.org]

Quote:
...fig plants can quickly reach 15 to 30 feet in height. The canopy can spread equally wide. The root system is typically very shallow without a taproot and can easily spreads to three times the diameter of the canopy. Ideally, fig plants should have a well-drained loam with plenty of organic matter, but they will tolerate average to poor soil. Once they are established they are somewhat drought tolerant (probably due to their very extensive and wide-ranging root system).

You may not know which fig(s) you have. These selected quotes from the above site might help you to narrow it down. There is also a list of many figs with thier descriptions.

Quote:
Ficus carica is the northernmost species in the Ficus genus. Figs that are completely dormant before severely cold weather arrives can tolerate temperatures down to 15 to 20 F with little or no damage. Some varieties are hardier and can tolerate even lower temperatures. If the top is winterkilled, the plant will probably come back from the base or underground parts.
The hardiest figs include the old favorites Celeste and English Brown Turkey and some new varieties like Alma and Hardy Chicago.

The best time to transplant your fig would be late February or very early March, while it's still dormant and just about to break buds. You should root prune now. Here's directions from bjs496 aka James, near the bottom of the page at the 'Figs' forum at Garden Web in the US.
[forums.gardenweb.com]

Quote:
The size of the root ball should be based on the size of the tree. The tree I took out of the ground had the equivalent of a 4.5" diameter trunk. It came out of the ground with a root mass roughly 24" in diameter. I did, however, let the tree sit with a moat around it for the better part of a year so that it would grow more roots from the base of the tree. Pruning may not be necessary if you take enough of the roots with the tree. If you want to prune it, but all means, do.
As for timing... now is the best time to dig the moat. Start with one side and cut a trench. Next week do another side and so forth until you have a box around your tree. I don't know how cold the ground gets in Atlanta, but remember that most of the trees roots will be in the top 8 inches of soil. You may want to cover the soil left around your tree with mulch and/or black landscaping fabric. Hopefully you will retain enough heat to allow the roots to continue to grow during the colder months ahead. Transplant the tree as soon as you are reasonably sure the last frost has passed. Stake the tree to minimize movement and water regularly.

The sooner you can move the tree before the leaves come, the better. The more the roots establish themselves before the tree breaks dormancy, the less you have to worry about wind and moisture and such.

~james

p.s. also don't expect too much from the tree next year.

Here's how to rootprune, transplant, water and mulch your trees. The second link has a video.
[www.utextension.utk.edu]
[www.arborday.org]
[www.ext.nodak.edu]
[www.treesaregood.com]
[cals.arizona.edu]
[hort.ifas.ufl.edu]


This site, though not in English, has lots of pics of figs. It might help with id for you.
[ficuscarica.com]

Newt

Subject Posted By Posted
|  when is the best time to transplant a fig bush (about 6 feet high) lynn 20/10/2008 14:06
||  Re: when is the best time to transplant a fig bush (about 6 feet high) Newt 20/10/2008 22:33

Advice offered in this forum is of a general nature only. It is by its nature not based on any site investigation and should not be relied upon. Neither the forum administrator nor any contributor will be held liable for damages occurring as a result of relying on advice given here. You should contact a competent arboriculturist for a more detailed answer.