UKTC Archive

RE: Chemical Damaged Ash?

Subject: RE: Chemical Damaged Ash?
From: Mike Ellison
Date: Jun 19 2006 16:52:34
That should have been flattened bud fasciation.


Mike


-----Original Message-----
From: Mike Ellison [mailto:mike@xxxxx.co.uk]
Sent: 19 June 2006 17:49
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: RE: Chemical Damaged Ash?


Bill

I have observed glyphosate causing a sort of bud fasciation on Tilia spp.
and when this flushed the following year there was very dense growth. 20 or
so years ago, I came across a street in Oldham with of ash trees full of the
fattened bud fasciation and wondered whether or not pesticides may have been
involved.  Stouts & Winter makes a mention of pesticides and fasciation.

Mike



-----Original Message-----
From: Andersonarb@xxxx.com [mailto:Andersonarb@xxxx.com]
Sent: 19 June 2006 17:25
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: Chemical Damaged Ash?


Quiet in here today; is there football on?

That aside I've just come back from a soon to be demolition site, little
boxes on the hillside sort of 60s development now being replaced. There are
a few
trees on the site mainly Ash & Norway Maple. As you'd imagine these are
typical 'open space' trees, bashed with mowers and sprayed around the base
excessively (to my way of thinking).

The Ash seem to have rather dense crowns, abnormally dense, and it occurs to
me I've seen similar unusually dense crowns on other Ash treated in this
way.

So does anybody know if this sort of growth might be caused by the residual
chemical? Has anybody else seen anything similar?

Thanks as always.

Bill.


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