UKTC Archive

Re: Guidance on Hedge Translocation

Subject: Re: Guidance on Hedge Translocation
From: Andersonarb
Date: Aug 03 2006 09:08:14
______________________________________________________________________
THE FUTURE OF TREE RISK MANAGEMENT?TEP 1-day Seminar?Context & Principles
for Non-defensive Risk Management?15th September at Woburn House Conference
Centre, London. With The Centre for Decision Analysis & Risk
Management?Professor John Adams ?Professor David J Ball?Dr David
Lonsdale?John Watt?Neville Fay?Mike Ellison?Nick Eden?GBP 165 per person (+
VAT)?Reservations: email seminars@xxxxxxxxxx.co.uk?Tel. 0117 XXXX XXX
______________________________________________________________________

 
In a message dated 02/08/2006 14:02:03 GMT Standard Time,  
dom@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.co.uk writes:

Many are  linked to medieval field systems and
some are possibly late Romano  British.  In short they're old and nearly all
of them appear on  1830-1860 maps but their species rich nature indicates
they're far  older.  7 woody species in 10m streches is very common - often
higher  and in 100m stretches 7 woody species - easy.  


While I accept you're most probably right Dom, I've planted hedges with 7  
woody species in less than 10 metres......
 
If you're trying to apply Hooper's Law then be careful, I've frequently had  
people tell me that a hedge must be old cos there are 5 or 6 species. Well  
Hooper said his Law wasn't safe to use north of south Derbyshire, (so  that's 
me 
out) and some species are so invasive(?) (I don't like 'invasive' but  can't 
think of the right word) that they have to be ignored, Elm for one  IIRC. I 
think Hooper intended you to measure the whole length of the hedge,  count 
the 
species, then divide the species count by the number of 100metre  lengths in 
the hedge. In a traffic jam once we (me and the crew) worked it out  for the 
M1 
verge, a sort of hedgerow, based on what we could see growing and  what we 
could recall having seen, and it came out at 35 years old..... 
 
My point was there won't have been that much evolution in a hedge bank when  
compared to a woodland edge, and we frequently see creatures and plants  
colonising areas quite rapidly after extensive change. Not that I'm saying 
that  we 
don't also see mankind making a complete bollox of something without even  
realising we've got something out of which to make a bollox.
 
Bill.


-- 
The UK Tree Care mailing list
To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info