UKTC Archive

Re: Non invasive cable brace

Subject: Re: Non invasive cable brace
From: Jonathan Mills
Date: Dec 28 2006 00:22:25
On 22/12/06, Scott Cullen <dscottcul@xxxx.net> wrote:
Like anything else, cable bracing requires some thought and understanding of 
good practice.  The first issue as you note in this case is whether the brace 
is needed in the first place.  Another is the ratio of drilled hole size to 
stem size.  ANSI A300-Part 3 specifies this.  I can't say with this observed 
I've ever seen branches break at attachment points.  Another issue is the 
vigorousness of growth.  In some species - and the literature observes this - 
you are really looking for callus and woundwood overgrowing the hardware to 
provide the long term holding power.

Cheers!
 ----- Original Message -----
 From: Jerry Ross
 To: UK Tree Care
 Sent: Friday, December 22, 2006 4:21 AM
 Subject: Re: Non invasive cable brace


 There were zones of dead bark spreading from around each insertion point
 - oval areas of necrotic (and in some cases decaying) tissue on both
 sides where the bolts passed through; they weren't present other than at
 the bolt insertions and as far as I was concerned provided a very
 positive correlation between making holes in walnut and causing damage
 to develop.

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Thanks for the comments so far sorry I ve been on holiday so just got
back a read inputs.

So the Cobra brace alledegedly holding up the two stems of the Scots
Pine needs to be inspected regularly at some inditerminable time.

So the lady who want to fell the protected tree because she is worried
about tree failure. Put in a brace some years ago because she was not
allowed to fell the tree TPO now wants to fell the tree because
according to her application can't afford the inspection costs. While
TPO can not inforce work on trees by default it becomes that if you
can't fell the tree. I suppose she can remove the brace and have the
risk of a tree falling very close/ onto her house.

The appeal will rumble on I have suggested the current cable is
inspected/adjusted every two years. Or steel cables replace the
existing.

I think that predicting the dynamic movement in a living structure is
very difficult. Plus the added factor of weather makes the whole thing
appear unscientific. Does any one know the exact force a tree takes
when wind is blowing with or with out leaves? Does this have to be
measured be the cable strength is decided? Considering it was only 10
years since Claus M demonstrated the living structure of trees
intervention at this level seems a bit crude. Not to say some lovely
trees have had branches secured for a very long time with bracing.

Is bracing a bit of tree anthromorphism?  Is there a good book or referance?

I hope you all had a lovely xmas.

--
Jonathan Mills
17 Westhead Road North
Cookley
Kidderminster
01562 XXXXXX
07944 XXXXXX


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