UKTC Archive

Re: Risk of windthrow

Subject: Re: Risk of windthrow
From: Scott Cullen
Date: Dec 20 2007 11:18:45
SC:  Forestry Commission have lots and lots of information.  Search on FC and 
windthrow.  And Dr, Barry Gardiner is a lead researcher.

SC As an aside, going back to some undergraduate archaeology of the British 
Isles, I think chert is the whitish layer found on the outside of roundish 
flint nodules. Stone age man gathered these nodules along beaches and river 
beds to make into flint tools.  The nodules also became trade objects becuase 
they werer not found everywhere.  

SC


  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Peter Thurman 
  To: UK Tree Care 
  Sent: Thursday, December 20, 2007 3:25 AM
  Subject: Risk of windthrow


  Can anyone (in the south-west I guess) offer any advice/information
  regarding the properties of a certain soil that I have come across in
  Dorset? It has been described to me as "greensand with chert". Chert being a
  rock type present not unlike flint is in soils in my neck of the woods (East
  Sussex).

   

  I am particularly interested in its behaviour on steeply sloping woodland
  sites. It seems pretty unstable and windthrow quite a common occurrence.

   

  Peter



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The UKTC is supported by The Arbor Centre
http://www.arborcentre.co.uk/