UKTC Archive

RE: Risk of windthrow

Subject: RE: Risk of windthrow
From: Rupert Baker
Date: Dec 20 2007 20:26:34
Dear Peter,
as a South Western member with a bit of experience of greensands, I would
not have said they are particularly prone to windthrow.  An example is the
woodland that grows on the top of the 'East Hill Strips' and related ridges
in East devon; the greensand is a subtrata that is pretty solid; but it
produces a poor soil (in Agricultural terms - ie low nutrient status), and
so was planted/ allowed to remain as woodland.  The woods up on these ridges
dont seem to blow any worse than elsewhere; and are up and exposed
too..........

Have a good Christmas

Rupert

-----Original Message-----
From: Peter Thurman [mailto:thurmanconsult@xxxxxxxxxxx.com]
Sent: 20 December 2007 08:25
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: Risk of windthrow


Can anyone (in the south-west I guess) offer any advice/information
regarding the properties of a certain soil that I have come across in
Dorset? It has been described to me as "greensand with chert". Chert being a
rock type present not unlike flint is in soils in my neck of the woods (East
Sussex).



I am particularly interested in its behaviour on steeply sloping woodland
sites. It seems pretty unstable and windthrow quite a common occurrence.



Peter



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