UKTC Archive

RE: Alternative extraction/conversion etc [Scanned]

Subject: RE: Alternative extraction/conversion etc [Scanned]
From: Edmund Hopkins
Date: Dec 08 2008 11:52:40
There's any amount of stuff on the net about horse extraction in the UK, much 
of it economic comparisons with motorised extraction. And didn't the Parnham 
Trust do work on use of small roundwood to existing construction material 
standards?

Edmund

Edmund Hopkins
Tree Officer
Planning Services
Nottingham City Council
________________________________________
From: Hare, Gareth [gareth.hare@xxxxxxxxxxxx.gov.uk]
Sent: 08 December 2008 11:44
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: Alternative extraction/conversion etc [Scanned]

On the back of the Elephant thread (which the double decker thread seems
to be seguing into) it occurred to me that John has a very good point.
When the oil does run out, how are we in Northern climes to undertake
our heavy extraction? Of course, we may be helped by scientists in
breeding a tractable recreation of the woolly mammoth. However I suppose
that the only practical alternative is to use horses to extract what we
can and to break down larger butts in the forest. Small amounts of
biodiesel being presumably avaiable for our portable saws?

That said: I recall photos of Oz and the Pacific northwest with large
mule and bullock teams hauling out loads of very large butts presumably
to water or steam driven mills. In addition I guess we're going to have
to go back to using more products in the round which will be no bad
thing. Might encourage markets for smaller thinnings anyway.

So: markets for smaller thinnings = better forest management.
Water/steam/wind driven mills= sustainable Horses etc all fully
sustainable extraction methods. Peoples expectations of the supply chain
esp speed of will have to change over time I expect. It's a brave
new/old world isn't it?

Anyone any thoughts on this? Mr Fuest are you lurking?




Gareth D Hare
Arboricultural Officer
Lichfield District Council


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