UKTC Archive

Re: Throw away your resistographs

Subject: Re: Throw away your resistographs
From: Simon Valente
Date: Dec 14 2008 10:33:56

 "FRASS:
 Etymology - From Old High German fraz, frezzan (German fressen), to eat."

There is also the German word "fräsen", which means to mill, or grind a solid 
to a powder, which could well be where the word Fraß comes from. ie to grind 
ones food.

Perhaps if the (resistograph) drill bit was modified to remove the powered 
wood as it went in (or out), it would be a better tool? 

Simon Valente
 
 

========================================
 Message Received: Dec 13 2008, 04:49 PM
 From: "Jerry Ross" 
 To: "UK Tree Care" 
 Cc: 
 Subject: Re: Throw away your resistographs
 
 
 Rodger Taylor wrote:

----- Original Message ----- From: "Mike Ellison" 

I think that I have already picked up three instances in this thread 
where the word 'frass' (insect faeces) has been used to >describe 
woody debris. It could inadvertently slip into common mis-usage.

Isn't frass the woody debris a wood-boring insect leaves behind as it 
bores, not faeces. So using the word to describe the sawdust left 
behing by a drill may not be so wrong.
 
 "FRASS:
 Etymology - From Old High German fraz, frezzan (German fressen), to eat.
 Noun;  Singular.
 Plural:  frass (uncountable)
 
    1. The droppings or excrement of insects."
 
 
 Good Lord - We''ll be calling the stock of a tree a "monolith" next!!
 
 
 
 
 
 
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