UKTC Archive

Re: A bit of seasonal tree news

Subject: Re: A bit of seasonal tree news
From: Ben Maxted
Date: Dec 21 2011 14:48:43
Nick et al
it depends what is being grown,with a famine on in Somalia/Kenya this means
there is a vibrant demand for agricultural products which outstrips the
demand for Frankincense. However  from my experience high quality
Frankincense always commanded a high price. However given the turmoil in
the North African and near eat at present it may be that demand is
suppressed.
Millet and Sorghum can be grown on rocky and steep land provided there is
enough water and the many pests and diseases can be controlled of course.
Take a trip out to these places with Tree Aid/Oxfam or Save the Children
and you will get a better idea.It cannot be done from the armchair folks
Merry Christmas and Jolly boxmas to one and all
Ben



On Wed, Dec 21, 2011 at 12:30 PM, Burke, Nicholas <
Nicholas.Burke@xxxxxxxxxx.gov.uk> wrote:

The statement I've copied from it below shows how bad things the forests
are being cut down for agricultural land, now a part of my brain which I
admit has never had anything to do with farming wonders why are they
stripping what I would guess from the description 'rocky and steep' is
not the best land to grow food on are things so bad that we need to use
even this land. I guess the answer is yes but I do feel that the
resources to grow food without using this land could be providing (sorry
I'm trying to not point fingers. And surely as stated it covers other
species for a reason.

"The forests that remain are declining because the old individuals are
dying continuously, and there no new individuals coming into the system.
That means that the forests are running out of trees."

"In places like Oman and Yemen, it is being cut down systematically.
Now, in Ethiopia, it is being cut down as land is being turned over to
agriculture."

The small trees, which generally reach a height of no more than 5m
(16ft), grow in steep, rocky habitats, providing cover for other plant
species.


-----Original Message-----
From: Tahir [mailto:tahir@xxxxxxxxxx.net]
Sent: 21 December 2011 12:07
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: A bit of seasonal tree news

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-16270759

We are so crap at looking after anything!

Tahir




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The UKTC is supported by The Arbor Centre
http://www.arborcentre.co.uk/