UKTC Archive

RE: Ganoderma applanatum/australe on n.maple - implications

Subject: RE: Ganoderma applanatum/australe on n.maple - implications
From: antony croft
Date: Dec 27 2011 15:00:06

Luke, if i may, I have also noted penetration and alteration in living tissue 
via Fistulina hepatica, to the point where I have a hypothesis on the co 
evolutionary role and adaptive growths instigated by the fungus itself in a 
mutually inclusive relationship.
One thing i can tell you with certainty, is that fistulina hepatica is a 
highly evolved and sophisticated fungi that modifies the tree form in ways 
that explain much of the form we see in many of our most ancient oaks and 
castaneas, that fungi are passive parasites is a fairy tale that many would 
have us believe, fungi are masters of the environment and driving forces of 
it and to believe that they are less than this is naive.
Gerrits work was the first time i had come across any info that would help, 
not necessarily confirm my own study into this fungi and its role in the TSSE 
(C) Gerrit J Keizer.
A saprobe it certainly is not, not by any stretch of the imagination, but 
that is not to say it is a pathogen, least not in the U.K here it is a 
complex relationship that is responsible for the form of oaks in many 
locations.
tony


From: luketreescapes@xxxxxxxxxxx.com
To: uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info
Subject: RE: Ganoderma applanatum/australe on n.maple - implications
Date: Tue, 27 Dec 2011 14:05:25 +0000

Gerrit,
Thank you for your comments.  I hope you won't mind me asking you to expand 
on the following paragraph.

"4. Of which Fistulina hepatica is an example, as it first "feeds" on 
tannin or vinegar acids produced by the sapwood of the tree (Quercus 
robur/petrea, Castanea sativa) in defense, without causing a problem to the 
stability of the tree, because after the mycelium finally enters the 
cambium and causes a necrosis of living tissues and bark from which exposed 
(dead) sapwood it fruits, the tree compensates for the loss of stability in 
a tree species specific way (see : 
http://arbtalk.co.uk/forum/members/fungus-albums-fistulina-hepatica.html ), 
which is a good example of co-evolution between fungus and tree species."
 
The paragraph quoted above appears to indicate that you consider that 
Fistulina hepatica can kill sapwood and cambium.  I'm afraid that this is 
quite different from my understanding that F. Hepatica is purely a 
saprotroph that is specialised to colonise and gain its nutrition from 
heartwood.  However, I'll accept that it may also be able to obtain 
nutrition from dead sapwood if not 'out-competed' by wood decay fungi that 
are more able to utilise this substrate.  I'm sure that we are all aware 
that sapwood and cambium may die for a multitude of reasons: biotic, 
abiotic, but most often a combination of a number.  My understanding was 
that, once dead, F. hepatica maybe able to utilise the newly available 
substrate as a secondary saprotroph.  If it's not too much trouble could 
you please recount the steps you've taken to eliminate these potentially 
primary reasons for sapwood and cambium death and enabled you to come to 
your conclusions.  

Many thanks in anticipation.

Luke



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