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RE: CellWeb access drive - any examples?

Subject: RE: CellWeb access drive - any examples?
From: Bryan Clary
Date: Mar 23 2012 10:46:09
Apologies, to be clearer I should have said a final surface of tarmac or 
block paving. The potential limitations of 3 dimensional cellular confinement 
systems are understood therefore the dilemma and why we are looking at all 
possibilities with engineers and have had feedback from highways. The plan is 
actually to use block paving but I'm trying to find a reasonably local site 
where CellWeb in general has been successful with reasonable traffic. It was 
mentioned once in a meeting that the concept of the 3 dimensional cellular 
confinement system originated from the army, therefore I think its cast in 
some people's minds that a military road is being constructed! 

The access is going to be around 50m long and we have looked at runoff with 
drainage specifications and an adaption of the kerb detail concreting in the 
final edge cell. The access itself is likely to be incorporated into a 
management company and not adopted (as getting that specification together 
would be definitely be the holy grail!)

Many thanks for the information that has been sent so far.

Bryan


-----Original Message-----
From: Ian Brewster [mailto:Ian.Brewster@xxxxx.gov.uk] 
Sent: 22 March 2012 15:36
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: RE: CellWeb access drive - any examples?


According to BS5837 (2005) you need to be aware that a 3d cellular 
confinement system such as cellweb is suitable 'for most types of traffic', 
suggesting that they have limited use, and presumably this relates to weight 
restriction. A Local Authority require a traditional construction with an 
impermeable and waterproof surface, so not ideal if you intend to retain good 
trees where their roots need to respire in order to remain alive.  




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