UKTC Archive

RE: Another big Beech to care for.

Subject: RE: Another big Beech to care for.
From: Ben Maxted
Date: Nov 13 2017 15:48:24
Scatter earthworms liberally?
Ben


On 13 Nov 2017 3:01 pm, "Jim Quaife" <jq@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.co.uk> wrote:

Just add a small point to Alastair's "fill-ups" of mulch, a few months ago
Tony Kirkham was showing the AARCs around Kew and surprised us all by
saying that just simply topping up mulch was something he no longer
indulged in. The reason is that the existing mulch by weathering and
footfall actually formed a barrier and new mulch on top was of
significantly reduced effectiveness.
This may be a symptom which affects Kew given the number of visitors, but
actually the proportion of people who do actually trample on mulch is
comparatively low.  For what it is worth, on the one hand I'm in no
position to contest Tony's knowledge and experience, but on the other it
seems to me that if existing mulch has "hardened off" then it should be
raked or otherwise disturbed so that any "layer" can be broken and the new
mulch integrated.
It does depend upon whether mulching is a restorative measure over the
short term, or a longer term measure.  That would depend upon the site, but
if as you say the foliage indicates that the tree is OK, that may be a good
sign in terms of the former, but again you don't mention the period over
which trafficking over the root system occurred or how long ago it was
reduced by the diversion.  As with all things to do with trees, it is all
down to justification in site-specific circumstances, but in general I
reckon that mulching is a "good thing".
Soil type??
Jim

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info [mailto:uktc-request@lists.
tree-care.info] On Behalf Of Charlie Ashworth
Sent: 13 November 2017 14:07
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: Re: Another big Beech to care for.

Thanks Alistair & Edmund.  I didn’t give enough info!

The compaction is less than a third of the actual rooting area but is
quite severe (construction traffic for rebuilding collapsed listed building
etc) and the fungal bodies sit against the buttresses of the roots from the
compacted area.

The traffic will continue to some extent (access for three workers houses)
so I need to do something to sort the issue out and they are going to
resurface anyway so it needs to be done with my input rather than just that
of the builders who caused the damage.

I have been waiting a wee while, and whilst doing so I advised the owners
to reroute the heavy traffic and consider putting the tree in my care.  The
crown isn’t showing any signs, no die back at present.  But the fungal
infection is evident for the second year (sadly they keep calling me in
after they’re past their best).  I think the owners hoped it would go away,
but it hasn’t, so they’re now inclined to let me do my best for the tree.

The direct damage to the exposed roots makes me inclined to do more rather
than less.  I feel if we can improve the situation it would give these
roots a chance of recovery.

Your thoughts are much appreciated
Charlie


On 13 Nov 2017, at 13:47, Edmund Hopkins <Edmund.Hopkins@
nottinghamcity.gov.uk> wrote:

Much will depend on the extent and severity of the compaction, how long
the trafficking has been underway, and how much of the actual (rather than
the radial formula) root area has been compromised. I'd just urge caution
before embarking upon a series of remedial measures and investigations.
"Wait and see", maybe? As for retrenchment pruning, you might follow the
dieback with the saw, but the dieback itself can tell a story.

Edmund

Edmund Hopkins
Tree Officer
Heritage and Urban Design
City Planning
0115 XXXXXXX

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info
[mailto:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info] On Behalf Of Charlie
Ashworth
Sent: 13 November 2017 13:30
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Another big Beech to care for.

Hello All,

I have a client with another very large Beech with a partially compacted
rooting area (caused by excessive traffic for the type of surface, some
surface root damage and some fungal fruiting bodies of possibly honey
fungus (rotted down so difficult to tell).  Stem is sound, crown is
stunningly perfect. Owners are aware of risks and would like to maintain
tree for as long as possible.

Ideally I’d like to arrange decompaction/aeration, root investigation,
mulching, create a new driveway surface (including cellular system and
permeable surface) and create an aesthetically pleasing barrier to stop
traffic cutting the corner again and causing direct damage to the exposed
roots.  Majority of traffic has already been diverted, but some access to
the rear of the property is still required (I did suggest moving it all but
that was a step too far).

In the long term I have warned that systematic retrenchment may be
required as well as the above, though I am loathe to do this to a beech and
such a fine specimen.

I ask for any sources of information, guidance, or research on similar
cases.  Also, of any contacts for advice or the decompaction, aeration and
root investigation that cover the north west of England.

And of course if there is something that I may not have mentioned as a
course of action you feel would be pertinent in saving this ‘big Ol’ girl’
from past poor management, please do let me know.


Best Wishes
Charlie




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__ AXCISCAPE SOFTWARE for on-site tree surveying and plotting to CAD.
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______________________________________________________________________
AXCISCAPE SOFTWARE for on-site tree surveying and plotting to CAD.
Download for free and try the demo. Visit: http://www.axciscape.com

ARBORSHADOW R4 shadow plotting software.
Visit: http://www.arborshadow.com

CAD DRAWING SERVICE. Visit: http://www.chrisskellern.com
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______________________________________________________________________
AXCISCAPE SOFTWARE for on-site tree surveying and plotting to CAD.
Download for free and try the demo. Visit: http://www.axciscape.com

ARBORSHADOW R4 shadow plotting software.
Visit: http://www.arborshadow.com

CAD DRAWING SERVICE. Visit: http://www.chrisskellern.com
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______________________________________________________________________
AXCISCAPE SOFTWARE for on-site tree surveying and plotting to CAD.
Download for free and try the demo. Visit: http://www.axciscape.com

ARBORSHADOW R4 shadow plotting software.
Visit: http://www.arborshadow.com

CAD DRAWING SERVICE. Visit: http://www.chrisskellern.com
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