UKTC Archive

Re: Woodland Heritage Save Our Oak

Subject: Re: Woodland Heritage Save Our Oak
From: Wayne Tyson
Date: Dec 20 2017 22:20:17
I believe you are right. In fact, I suspect (and supporting evidence is
growing) that soil microbiomes are the essential component in ecosystem
health, including, of course, mycorrhizal fungi. I suspect that microbiomes
are in a constant state of flux, reflecting the dynamic web of life, from
individual organisms to all ecosystems large and small.

This was the key concept behind ecosystem restoration which I first worked
out in a very crude (but effective) way in the late '60's and applied to my
first truly successful (after at least fifteen years of failures)
large-scale ecosystem restoration project in 1972. As I continued to work
over the years, I was forced (seduced) to consider smaller and smaller
organisms and their interdependence with other organisms.

So you can see that I was and am truly interested in elaboration on your
point of trophic "cascades."

Wayne

On Wed, Dec 20, 2017 at 9:19 AM, Dom Gane <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> wrote:

[Text converted from HTML]
Trophic. I'm not being obscure. I think that soil the communities, likely
mycorrhizal fungi, have changed due to climate change and atmospheric
deposition, possibly eutrophication. I think, and there is good evidence
that multitrophic interactions occur between mycs and insect herbivores.
I have data which indicates that S. bovinus (a mycorrhizal fungi)
inhibits A. mellea.



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