UKTC Archive

Re: the penny dropped.....

Subject: Re: the penny dropped.....
From: Wayne Tyson
Date: Jan 04 2019 19:42:55
Organisms (or parts thereof) will develop in the presence of favorable
conditions, and will not develop under unfavorable ones.

*Ficus* of the same species, for example, will develop aerial roots large
enough, numerous enough, and far enough from the ground to make tolerably
good cattle pens under the right conditions, but will either not develop at
all or produce only vestigial ones in less salubrious environments.

Organisms (or parts thereof) are *opportunists*, governed by the *totality*
of their environments, including their own physiological and genetic
makeup.

Wayne

On Fri, Jan 4, 2019 at 9:54 AM Jon Heuch <jh@xxxxxxxx.co.uk> wrote:

I don't think the initiation process for roots is too difficult to explain,
whether they originate from axillary buds or from the inner cambium - it's
all about biochemistry and hormonal balance; those with experience of
vegetative propagation will be well versed in this. I have to admit that in
a former life I spent over two years in a laboratory, desperately trying to
escape from boredom, putting on weight faster than a couch potato due to
the
lack of exercise but I did get a lot of experience of encouraging root
growth from stems (and shoots from roots) to identify the best balance of
sugar, cytokinin and auxin along with any expensive chemical I could get my
hands on. ...oh yes and do it right you can get flowers to develop too.



On the whole it's a lot easier to initiate rooting structures than it is
shoots. Flowers...well that is largely by chance (in my case).



Jon






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