UKTC Archive

Re: Ustulina as was

Subject: Re: Ustulina as was
From: Julian Morris
Date: Feb 06 2019 16:45:45
Thanks, I'll try and absorb it. I see to relates only toBasidiomycetes, but I 
expect the principles ar ethe same for Ascomycetes.

Schwarze et al merely say "Fungus speceis which form demarcation lines in 
decayed wood also actively control the moisture conditions in the substrate 
(Rypacek 1966)" But there's also reference to sprinkler-irrigates spruce 
stack experiments showing no apparent upper limit to moisture content for 
decay. It's the other end of the scale we're considering, and the lower limit 
seems to be 25%. This is where I got to before, woodpile decay by Armillaria 
and Kretz and many other fungi may stall as logs dry but persist if they are 
exposed to occasional wetting. External saprophytes may benefit from rain on 
the log pile where internal fungi wouldn't.

ANd htere was interesting debate recently over England's ban on wet firewood 
sales, I can't remember the moisture limit, but it was slightly below the 
atmospheric humidity levels that firewood suppliers encounter (c.25%). 
Basically supplies would have to be heated to dry out to the legal limit, and 
would then rehydrate even in covered storage at trhe customer's. Which makes 
a mockery of the new limits.

Julian A. Morris - Professional Tree Services
jamtrees.co.uk  and  highhedgesscotland.com
0778 XXX XXXX - 0141 XXX XXXX


Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2019 at 4:11 PM
From: "Michael Richardson" <richardsontreecare@xxxxxx.com>
To: "UK Tree Care" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Ustulina as was

There are loads of species that create rhizomorphs
pseudosclerotical plates are also very common and are the result of genets
fighting for space and walling off their territory from invaders.
This publication provides an introduction to competition between fungi.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S01660XXXXXXXXXXX

Michael Richardson B.Sc.F., BCMA
Ontario MTCU Qualified Arborist
Richardson Tree Care
Richardsontreecare.ca
613-475-2877
800-769-9183

  <http://www.richardsontreecare.ca/images/Tree_Doc_logo_email.png>



On Wed, Feb 6, 2019 at 11:03 AM Julian Morris <jamorris@xxxxx.com> wrote:

Bill, bootlaces it is. But what they are for is to allow the carrying of
water and bundles of hyphae the decay face where otherwise decay would not
be possible. Armillariad Kretz are the two parasitic fungi that I know of
that create a visible black pseudosclerotic layer, which perhaps
simplistically I have taken to be among other things a layer for 
regulating
humidity by the fungus. A bootlacey buried lump might still decay because
water is getting to the decay face, but Kretz is an ascomycete with
substantially different structure and it may not have the capacity to move
water as effectively.

I should check sources but I have deadlines. I think I got most of this
lore from Fungal Decay Strategies, Schwartze et al.

Julian A. Morris - Professional Tree Services
jamtrees.co.uk  and  highhedgesscotland.com
0778 XXX XXXX - 0141 XXX XXXX


Sent: Wednesday, February 06, 2019 at 2:10 PM
From: "Bill Anderson" <anderson.arb.original@xxxxxx.com>
To: "UK Tree Care" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Ustulina as was

Aw flippin eck! Bootlaces!

On Wed, 6 Feb 2019 at 14:01, John Booth <info@xxxxxxxx.co.uk> wrote:

Rhizomes or rhizomorphs?  Armillaria or Amaryllis?? ;0)

Regards,

J A Booth MBA, MSc, FRICS, FICF, FCIHort, RCArborA, CUEW, CEnv,
DipArb(RFS), FArborA, NDArb, LCGI(Hort)
Chartered Surveyor, Chartered Arboriculturist, Chartered
Environmentalist
& Certificated Expert Witness

On 6 Feb 2019, at 13:53, Bill Anderson <
anderson.arb.original@xxxxxx.com>
wrote:

Hmm; while I'd agree that Armillaria sitting in the dry (under-cover
but
not heated or anything) doesn't seem to spread, excavating old whole
logs
from the bottom of the junk heap (not under-cover and probably
resting on
rotten timber-residues) often seems to reveal logs pretty well
covered in
rhizomes, which probably weren't so widespread when the log was put
there.
can't say the same for Kretschz.

One fungus that definitely seems to grow on piles of drying timber 
is
Sooty
Bark on Sycamore. I've certainly seen that spread over stacked
cordwood,
usually when there was no obvious sooty bark when the timber was 
cut.
Strangely such timber burns really well...

On Wed, 6 Feb 2019 at 12:46, Brewster, Ian <
Ian.Brewster@xxxxxxx.co.uk>
wrote:

That sounds like an interesting observation Julian.
I recall Dr. Glynn Percival at an AA show airspading at the base of
a
tree
affected by Armillaria, replacing soil voids with pea shingle to
aerate.
Presumably the thought was that this would arrest/limit the 
disease.
Might be worth experimenting in a quiet part of a woodland by
slitting
and
inserting a chainsaw into the base of a tree with Kretz to aerate
and
knock
out/reduce its virulence.
This may stimulate those Eiffel Tower structures that we sometime
see
with
pronounce buttress flares holding the tree up with little intact
heartwood.
That sounds like an interesting observation Julian.
I recall Dr. Glynn Percival at an AA show airspading at the base of
a
tree
affected by Armillaria, replacing soil voids with pea shingle to
aerate.
Presumably the thought was that this would arrest/limit the 
disease.
Might be worth experimenting in a quiet part of a woodland by
slitting
and
inserting a chainsaw into the base of a tree with Kretz to aerate
and
knock
out/reduce its virulence.
This may stimulate those Eiffel Tower structures that we sometime
see
with
pronounce buttress flares holding the tree up with little intact
heartwood.

From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info <
uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
On Behalf Of Julian Morris
Sent: 05 February 2019 15:41
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: RE: Ustulina as was

At my last house I got through a couple of Tonnes of firewood a
year,
and
I only brought the choice cuts home from sites. Living in a
residential
area, I made a point of ringing wood up on site so as not to be
using a
chainsaw at home. But occasionally there would be some long 
sections
sitting there for months. I found that Kretz and Armillaria victims
got
no
worse, basically deprived of internal moisture they gave up. But 
the
saprophytes wasted no time, I regularly got Nectria cinnabarina and
Stereum
but not a lot else. The latter could render a log fairly useless as
firewood pretty quickly. Dried out logs are anightmare to cut
anyway, so
they usually ended up tossed onto on a truck going to the coup, 3
or 6
months after I thught it would be a good idea to bring them home...

Julian A. Morris - Professional Tree Services
jamtrees.co.uk<http://jamtrees.co.uk> and highhedgesscotland.com<
http://highhedgesscotland.com>
0778 XXX XXXX - 0141 XXX XXXX
NPS
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info <
uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> On Behalf Of Julian Morris
Sent: 05 February 2019 15:41
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: RE: Ustulina as was

At my last house I got through a couple of Tonnes of firewood a
year,
and
I only brought the choice cuts home from sites. Living in a
residential
area, I made a point of ringing wood up on site so as not to be
using a
chainsaw at home. But occasionally there would be some long 
sections
sitting there for months. I found that Kretz and Armillaria victims
got
no
worse, basically deprived of internal moisture they gave up. But 
the
saprophytes wasted no time, I regularly got Nectria cinnabarina and
Stereum
but not a lot else. The latter could render a log fairly useless as
firewood pretty quickly. Dried out logs are anightmare to cut
anyway, so
they usually ended up tossed onto on a truck going to the coup, 3
or 6
months after I thught it would be a good idea to bring them home...

Julian A. Morris - Professional Tree Services
jamtrees.co.uk<http://jamtrees.co.uk> and highhedgesscotland.com<
http://highhedgesscotland.com>
0778 XXX XXXX - 0141 XXX XXXX



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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/




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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/





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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/