UKTC Archive

RE: RE: Ustulina as was

Subject: RE: RE: Ustulina as was
From: Brewster, Ian
Date: Feb 07 2019 11:35:30
Hopefully you book is stored in a nice dry place Rupert.
Standing and lying timbers within a woodland environment will inevitably 
absorb soil moisture.
For eco piles they say to attribute maximum benefit for flora/fauna that the 
logs need to be placed in the shade…
So presume this aspect encourages a great range of biological 
activity/including mycelial growth than exposed logs and/or those placed in 
sunlight.
.
Hopefully you book is stored in a nice dry place Rupert.
Standing and lying timbers within a woodland environment will inevitably 
absorb soil moisture.
For eco piles they say to attribute maximum benefit for flora/fauna that the 
logs need to be placed in the shade…
So presume this aspect encourages a great range of biological 
activity/including mycelial growth than exposed logs and/or those placed in 
sunlight.
.

From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info <uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> 
On Behalf Of Rupert Baker
Sent: 07 February 2019 10:25
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: RE: RE: Ustulina as was

It is a good point, Bill. I guess it depends on the fungal species involved - 
most of the pathogens we see or deal with occur on living trees - though I've 
seen some good fruit bodies on felled/fallen ones, evidently developed after 
the timber was laid down flat. It may depend on the moisture content - praps 
it has to be just right, like Goldilock's porridge?
I will have a look at a very useful old book I have - the decay of timber & 
its prevention - Cartwright & Findlay 1946 from the forest Products research 
Lab; and see if they have any suggestions - it deals with rots of standing 
and felled/ milled timber. Will let you know if I find anything
Atb
Rupert

-----Original Message-----
From: 
uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info<mailto:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> 
<uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info<mailto:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>>
 On Behalf Of Bill Anderson
Sent: 06 February 2019 17:56
To: UK Tree Care 
<uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info<mailto:uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>>
Subject: Re: RE: Ustulina as was

Which gets us back to my original throwaway comment Rupert; how come the 
firewood in my shed doesn't decay as it gets ever drier? Confusing isn't it?

On Wed, 6 Feb 2019 at 17:10, Rupert Baker 
<rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk<mailto:rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk>>
wrote:

Probably because the fungus dries the timber out, Bill - a lot of them
do that as a strategy to aid their spread through drier (therefore
more
aerated) wood
All the best

Rupert
PS I'de agree re seeing armillaria rhizomorphs over fallen/cut &
stacked dead timber
NPS
 From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info 
<uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> On Behalf Of Rupert Baker
Sent: 07 February 2019 10:25
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: RE: RE: Ustulina as was

It is a good point, Bill. I guess it depends on the fungal species involved - 
most of the pathogens we see or deal with occur on living trees - though I've 
seen some good fruit bodies on felled/fallen ones, evidently developed after 
the timber was laid down flat. It may depend on the moisture content - praps 
it has to be just right, like Goldilock's porridge?
I will have a look at a very useful old book I have - the decay of timber & 
its prevention - Cartwright & Findlay 1946 from the forest Products research 
Lab; and see if they have any suggestions - it deals with rots of standing 
and felled/ milled timber. Will let you know if I find anything
Atb
Rupert

-----Original Message-----
From: 
uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info<mailto:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> 
<uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info<mailto:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>>
 On Behalf Of Bill Anderson
Sent: 06 February 2019 17:56
To: UK Tree Care 
<uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info<mailto:uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>>
Subject: Re: RE: Ustulina as was

Which gets us back to my original throwaway comment Rupert; how come the 
firewood in my shed doesn't decay as it gets ever drier? Confusing isn't it?

On Wed, 6 Feb 2019 at 17:10, Rupert Baker 
<rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk<mailto:rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk>>
wrote:

Probably because the fungus dries the timber out, Bill - a lot of them
do that as a strategy to aid their spread through drier (therefore
more
aerated) wood
All the best

Rupert
PS I'de agree re seeing armillaria rhizomorphs over fallen/cut &
stacked dead timber



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