UKTC Archive

Re: RE: RE: Ustulina as was

Subject: Re: RE: RE: Ustulina as was
From: Julian Morris
Date: Feb 07 2019 15:17:01
Adn Scwarze say the critical component is oxygen. More decay means more 
oxygen measn more decay. Oxygen is unrestricted on the external surfcace.

Which brings me back to Kretz, the champion of the parasites. It can famously 
operate anaerobically in soft rot mode. But not without moisture, I'd wager.

Julian A. Morris - Professional Tree Services
jamtrees.co.uk  and  highhedgesscotland.com
0778 XXX XXXX - 0141 XXX XXXX


Sent: Thursday, February 07, 2019 at 10:24 AM
From: "Rupert Baker" <rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk>
To: "UK Tree Care" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: RE: RE: Ustulina as was

It is a good point, Bill. I guess it depends on the fungal species involved 
- most of the pathogens we see or deal with occur on living trees - though 
I've seen some good fruit bodies on felled/fallen ones, evidently developed 
after the timber was laid down flat. It may depend on the moisture content 
- praps it has to be just right, like Goldilock's porridge?
I will have a look at a very useful old book I have - the decay of timber & 
its prevention - Cartwright & Findlay 1946 from the forest Products 
research Lab; and see if they have any suggestions - it deals with rots of 
standing and felled/ milled timber. Will let you know if I find anything
Atb
Rupert

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info 
<uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> On Behalf Of Bill Anderson
Sent: 06 February 2019 17:56
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: RE: Ustulina as was

Which gets us back to my original throwaway comment Rupert; how come the 
firewood in my shed doesn't decay as it gets ever drier? Confusing isn't it?

On Wed, 6 Feb 2019 at 17:10, Rupert Baker <rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk>
wrote:

Probably because the fungus dries the timber out, Bill - a lot of them
do that as a strategy to aid their spread through drier (therefore
more
aerated) wood
All the best

Rupert
PS I'de agree re seeing armillaria rhizomorphs over fallen/cut &
stacked dead timber


-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info
<uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
On Behalf Of Bill Anderson
Sent: 06 February 2019 13:53
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: RE: Ustulina as was

Hmm; while I'd agree that Armillaria sitting in the dry (under-cover
but not heated or anything) doesn't seem to spread, excavating old
whole logs from the bottom of the junk heap (not under-cover and
probably resting on rotten timber-residues) often seems to reveal logs
pretty well covered in rhizomes, which probably weren't so widespread 
when the log was put there.
can't say the same for Kretschz.

One fungus that definitely seems to grow on piles of drying timber is
Sooty Bark on Sycamore. I've certainly seen that spread over stacked
cordwood, usually when there was no obvious sooty bark when the timber
was cut.
Strangely such timber burns really well...

On Wed, 6 Feb 2019 at 12:46, Brewster, Ian <Ian.Brewster@xxxxxxx.co.uk>
wrote:

That sounds like an interesting observation Julian.
I recall Dr. Glynn Percival at an AA show airspading at the base of
a tree affected by Armillaria, replacing soil voids with pea shingle
to
aerate.
Presumably the thought was that this would arrest/limit the disease.
Might be worth experimenting in a quiet part of a woodland by
slitting and inserting a chainsaw into the base of a tree with Kretz
to aerate and knock out/reduce its virulence.
This may stimulate those Eiffel Tower structures that we sometime
see with pronounce buttress flares holding the tree up with little
intact
heartwood.
That sounds like an interesting observation Julian.
I recall Dr. Glynn Percival at an AA show airspading at the base of
a tree affected by Armillaria, replacing soil voids with pea shingle
to
aerate.
Presumably the thought was that this would arrest/limit the disease.
Might be worth experimenting in a quiet part of a woodland by
slitting and inserting a chainsaw into the base of a tree with Kretz
to aerate and knock out/reduce its virulence.
This may stimulate those Eiffel Tower structures that we sometime
see with pronounce buttress flares holding the tree up with little
intact
heartwood.

From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info
<uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
On Behalf Of Julian Morris
Sent: 05 February 2019 15:41
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: RE: Ustulina as was

At my last house I got through a couple of Tonnes of firewood a
year, and I only brought the choice cuts home from sites. Living in
a residential area, I made a point of ringing wood up on site so as
not to be using a chainsaw at home. But occasionally there would be
some long sections sitting there for months. I found that Kretz and
Armillaria victims got no worse, basically deprived of internal
moisture they gave up. But the saprophytes wasted no time, I
regularly got Nectria cinnabarina and Stereum but not a lot else.
The latter could render a log fairly useless as firewood pretty
quickly. Dried out logs are anightmare to cut anyway, so they
usually ended up tossed onto on a truck going to the coup, 3 or 6
months after I thught it would
be a good idea to bring them home...

Julian A. Morris - Professional Tree Services
jamtrees.co.uk<http://jamtrees.co.uk> and highhedgesscotland.com<
http://highhedgesscotland.com>
0778 XXX XXXX - 0141 XXX XXXX
NPS
 From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info <
uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> On Behalf Of Julian Morris
Sent: 05 February 2019 15:41
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: RE: Ustulina as was

At my last house I got through a couple of Tonnes of firewood a
year, and I only brought the choice cuts home from sites. Living in
a residential area, I made a point of ringing wood up on site so as
not to be using a chainsaw at home. But occasionally there would be
some long sections sitting there for months. I found that Kretz and
Armillaria victims got no worse, basically deprived of internal
moisture they gave up. But the saprophytes wasted no time, I
regularly got Nectria cinnabarina and Stereum but not a lot else.
The latter could render a log fairly useless as firewood pretty
quickly. Dried out logs are anightmare to cut anyway, so they
usually ended up tossed onto on a truck going to the coup, 3 or 6
months after I thught it would
be a good idea to bring them home...

Julian A. Morris - Professional Tree Services
jamtrees.co.uk<http://jamtrees.co.uk> and highhedgesscotland.com<
http://highhedgesscotland.com>
0778 XXX XXXX - 0141 XXX XXXX



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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy 
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/




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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/





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The UK Tree Care mailing list
To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/