UKTC Archive

Re: ID suggestions

Subject: Re: ID suggestions
From: Tahir Sharif
Date: Jun 11 2019 11:28:29
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Glad the mystery's solved. Talking of durian I'm reading a really interesting book at the moment:

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Explorer-Adventures-Globe-Trotting-Botanist-Transformed/dp/1101XXXXXX

Tahir

On 11/06/2019 12:11, Jerry Ross wrote:
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Problem solved.  I went and had a look myself and durians can be safely ruled out. Your tree IDs were all correct:  there are two trees close together, one a Bird Cherry Prunus padus (from which the photo of the ragged, insect-chomped leaves come) and next to it, a multi-stemmed goat willow - and it's the willow that has these galls, lots of them, all over the place.

As well as the galls, the willow also has quite a lot of rust on the leaves and that, spreading onto some of the galls, is no doubt what gave the growth in the picture its yellow colour - most are brownish-green (see attached). And they're pretty clearly galls of the willow flowers reported as being caused by the mite  Stenacis triradiatus
(eg see here):- https://1clickurls.com/EPjRZHA
It is difficult to find anything about it for the UK, but there are lots of reports in Holland and Sweden  ( https://www.gbif.org/species/4544890 ) - perhaps they have keener cecidologists!   While it seems to be rather little known in this country it's not UNknown, at least not in Leicestershire & Rutland: see here https://www.naturespot.org.uk/species/mossy-willow-catkin-gall That site suggests that the galls aren't actually caused by /Stenacis /but by 'a virus or phytoplasma' - the mites just live in the resulting growths.




On 10/06/2019 15:30, Rupert Baker wrote:
Bit small for Durian's, but I know what you mean; probably don’t smell the same, either ... Looks like a cherry as you say;  I've seen multiple cellular proliferations like these on cherries, but not so spectacular.
atb
Rupert

-----Original Message-----
From:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info <uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>  On Behalf Of Jerry Ross
Sent: 10 June 2019 12:25
To: UK Tree Care<uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: ID suggestions

Any ideas what's going on here -
There's very little information - the enquirer only says that "there are two cherries with weird yellow growths"  and "These are approx plum size and have orange powdery stuff on them." (Cherries...? leaves look more like plum.  Unless they're Durian perhaps!)


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