UKTC Archive

Re: Management of 'drawn up' deciduous tree and woodland strips along high speed roads

Subject: Re: Management of 'drawn up' deciduous tree and woodland strips along high speed roads
From: Brewster, Ian
Date: Jul 09 2019 22:03:45
Hi Wayne,
The thinning is incidental to the operation by removing trees which a. Are 
obstructing vehicles and b. Are structurally weakened because they have used 
resources to compete for light versus stability via investment in top growth 
than a standalone and sturdy single stem.
.

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: Wayne Tyson <wt750mv@xxxxxx.com>
Date: 09/07/2019 22:37 (GMT+00:00)
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Management of 'drawn up' deciduous tree and woodland strips 
along high speed roads

Seems like a context-dependent situation (aren't they all?). There are some
considerations, with which I presume most all y'all are familiar. I'm
including one in case it might shed light on the issue in general and might
be helpful in this case, and I will appreciate any feedback, positive or
not.

If trees are susceptible to windthrow, how much good will thinning actually
do to prevent their failure? Why do some trees resist wind forces and some
not? For example, many trees are left standing (even when shorn of leaves,
small branches, and even bark) after a tornado or hurricane. Please explain
this phenomenon, including what is a the root of the matter.

Wayne





On Tue, Jul 9, 2019 at 10:56 AM Brynley Andrews <brynley.andrews@xxxxxx.com>
wrote:

Ian
Off topic slightly, but anyway......subject to site specific issues: there
is a much higher risk to road users from run off road RTA involving hitting
a tree than tree fall.
Lowering the RTA-T risk doesn’t necessarily mean tree removal. Same goes
for tree-fall management.
Regards
Brynley

On Tue, 9 Jul 2019 at 17:52, Brewster, Ian <Ian.Brewster@xxxxxxx.co.uk>
wrote:

I'm facing a bit of a conundrum, my concern is thinning too much within a
restricted width (2-5 trees in 5m depth) to remove overhang obstruction
and
risk exposing other drawn up structures to wind fracture/throw.
Felling trees can be a concern for those residents who back on to these
wooded areas. They would see the 'natural' screen and 'sound barrier'
degrade.
Perhaps the right decision for safety is to fell all trees and remove the
potential risk of windthrow and managed in the future as small trees,
scrub
and coppice. Unfortunately for most of the areas I see this opportunity
lost and where trees have been allowed to grow, becoming 'drawn up'.
Tree strips along highways are often many miles long. A cost effective
approach with traffic management is now required.
Considering the above have you experience with managing such areas, what
is your considered best course of action and how have you dealt with the
concerns from residents? Any help and suggestions would be appreciated.
.
I'm facing a bit of a conundrum, my concern is thinning too much within a
restricted width (2-5 trees in 5m depth) to remove overhang obstruction
and
risk exposing other drawn up structures to wind fracture/throw.
Felling trees can be a concern for those residents who back on to these
wooded areas. They would see the 'natural' screen and 'sound barrier'
degrade.
Perhaps the right decision for safety is to fell all trees and remove the
potential risk of windthrow and managed in the future as small trees,
scrub
and coppice. Unfortunately for most of the areas I see this opportunity
lost and where trees have been allowed to grow, becoming 'drawn up'.
Tree strips along highways are often many miles long. A cost effective
approach with traffic management is now required.
Considering the above have you experience with managing such areas, what
is your considered best course of action and how have you dealt with the
concerns from residents? Any help and suggestions would be appreciated.
.
NPS




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The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/<http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/>

--
Brynley Arboriculturist / urban forester



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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

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http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/<http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/>
Hi Wayne,
The thinning is incidental to the operation by removing trees which a. Are 
obstructing vehicles and b. Are structurally weakened because they have used 
resources to compete for light versus stability via investment in top growth 
than a standalone and sturdy single stem.
.

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: Wayne Tyson <wt750mv@xxxxxx.com>
Date: 09/07/2019 22:37 (GMT+00:00)
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Management of 'drawn up' deciduous tree and woodland strips 
along high speed roads

Seems like a context-dependent situation (aren't they all?). There are some
considerations, with which I presume most all y'all are familiar. I'm
including one in case it might shed light on the issue in general and might
be helpful in this case, and I will appreciate any feedback, positive or
not.

If trees are susceptible to windthrow, how much good will thinning actually
do to prevent their failure? Why do some trees resist wind forces and some
not? For example, many trees are left standing (even when shorn of leaves,
small branches, and even bark) after a tornado or hurricane. Please explain
this phenomenon, including what is a the root of the matter.

Wayne





On Tue, Jul 9, 2019 at 10:56 AM Brynley Andrews <brynley.andrews@xxxxxx.com>
wrote:

Ian
Off topic slightly, but anyway......subject to site specific issues: there
is a much higher risk to road users from run off road RTA involving hitting
a tree than tree fall.
Lowering the RTA-T risk doesn’t necessarily mean tree removal. Same goes
for tree-fall management.
Regards
Brynley

On Tue, 9 Jul 2019 at 17:52, Brewster, Ian <Ian.Brewster@xxxxxxx.co.uk>
wrote:

I'm facing a bit of a conundrum, my concern is thinning too much within a
restricted width (2-5 trees in 5m depth) to remove overhang obstruction
and
risk exposing other drawn up structures to wind fracture/throw.
Felling trees can be a concern for those residents who back on to these
wooded areas. They would see the 'natural' screen and 'sound barrier'
degrade.
Perhaps the right decision for safety is to fell all trees and remove the
potential risk of windthrow and managed in the future as small trees,
scrub
and coppice. Unfortunately for most of the areas I see this opportunity
lost and where trees have been allowed to grow, becoming 'drawn up'.
Tree strips along highways are often many miles long. A cost effective
approach with traffic management is now required.
Considering the above have you experience with managing such areas, what
is your considered best course of action and how have you dealt with the
concerns from residents? Any help and suggestions would be appreciated.
.
I'm facing a bit of a conundrum, my concern is thinning too much within a
restricted width (2-5 trees in 5m depth) to remove overhang obstruction
and
risk exposing other drawn up structures to wind fracture/throw.
Felling trees can be a concern for those residents who back on to these
wooded areas. They would see the 'natural' screen and 'sound barrier'
degrade.
Perhaps the right decision for safety is to fell all trees and remove the
potential risk of windthrow and managed in the future as small trees,
scrub
and coppice. Unfortunately for most of the areas I see this opportunity
lost and where trees have been allowed to grow, becoming 'drawn up'.
Tree strips along highways are often many miles long. A cost effective
approach with traffic management is now required.
Considering the above have you experience with managing such areas, what
is your considered best course of action and how have you dealt with the
concerns from residents? Any help and suggestions would be appreciated.
.
NPS




--
The UK Tree Care mailing list
To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/<http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/>

--
Brynley Arboriculturist / urban forester



--
The UK Tree Care mailing list
To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/<http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/>




--
The UK Tree Care mailing list
To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/<http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/>
NPS
 



-- 
The UK Tree Care mailing list
To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/

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