UKTC Archive

RE: Big hairy common limes with a forest of basal sprouts

Subject: RE: Big hairy common limes with a forest of basal sprouts
From: Rupert Baker
Date: Oct 30 2019 19:46:42
Hear! Hear! Jerry; 
Most of the unbrowsed Tilia X europea I've ever seen produce epicormics ; I 
don’t know whether growing on river sands and shingles on the Thames 
flood-plain is a type of stress, but the Tilia at Hampton Court -and there 
are hundreds of all ages, and a fair number of different clones- will happily 
start developing epicormics as soon as the deer are fenced out - eg for the 7 
weeks of the Flower Show.
Having said that, some common Lime seem to be produce them in greater 
abundance than others.  I'd always assumed it was genetic; Julian do you have 
any reference to research or your observations to suggest it is down to 
stress?

Atb
Rupert

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info On Behalf Of Jerry Ross
Sent: 30 October 2019 10:59
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Big hairy common limes with a forest of basal sprouts

One case closes and another opens:
"Epicormic growth in limes is usually a response to damage or stress."
Really?
I though is was simply a characteristic of Tilia x Europaea



On 30/10/2019 10:38, Julian Morris wrote:
[Sigh] You always have to take things too far. And you're not funny.

Epicprmic growth in limes is usually a response to damage or stress. That 
is itelf is a trigger for a more detailed look at the tree by a competent 
inspector. Case closed.

Julian A. Morris - Professional Tree Services jamtrees.co.uk  and  
highhedgesscotland.com
0778 XXX XXXX - 0141 XXX XXXX


Sent: Monday, October 28, 2019 at 9:24 AM
From: "David Evans" <david@xxxxxxxxxxxxxx.com>
To: "UK Tree Care" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: RE: RE: How does one inspect big hairy common limes, allowed to 
grow a secondary forest of basal sprouts?

<<I frequently get epicormics removed, for clients who have accepted 
well-rounded advice, and epicormic removal can cost as little as £10 
a tree.>>

"Well-rounded advice"?

You've sketched out a text book example of hazard focused, risk-averse, 
base-rate neglect, risk entrepreneurship.

I particularly enjoyed the QVC shopping channel sales of pitch of, "Why 
not avoid forking out £250 000 for a claim when epicormic removal MAY save 
a life at a cost AS LITTLE as £10 a tree*?"

How about loosening your clients purse strings bit more by making the life 
that might be saved that of a child?  Even better, adding a possessive 
pronoun could help maximise the fear.  'Your child'.

Here's the reality, to establish some all-important proportionality.

Compared to other everyday risks that we readily accept, the overall risk 
to us and our property from tree failure is extremely low. The annual risk 
of a death or serious injury is less than one in a million. Given the 
number of trees we live with, and how many of us pass under them each and 
every day, being killed or injured by a tree is a very rare event.

That's for all trees.  Let's try to establish a base rate for Lime with 
epicormics and Kretzshmaria duesta.  Say, over the last 10 years.  How 
many Limes were there with epicormic growth, which didn't display obvious 
defects, and hosted Kretzschmaria that produced fruit bodies which could 
only be seen if the epicormics were removed, and resulted in so much decay 
it caused the tree to fail, and then killed or seriously injured someone?  
We can already figure out the risk is much less than one in ten million.  
Shall we just stop there?

Cheers

Acer Ventura

*Comes with a free repurposed Michael Parkinson Parker Pen we've got left 
over from our 'Remove all Ivy - You can never be too safe' campaign.
Terms & Conditions Apply.
Costs may vary, and "…the prospects of reducing the risk from tree failure 
below the current level are remote and comparable to finding a microscopic 
needle in a gargantuan haystack."


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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/