UKTC Archive

RE: [EXTERNAL] Re: Tree Root Literature

Subject: RE: [EXTERNAL] Re: Tree Root Literature
From: Harrison, Sean
Date: Nov 05 2019 09:47:24
Agreed.
After the 1987 storm I was warden of ,what was before the winds, a beech 
woodland / chalk grassland nature reserve. We lost 75% of the beech trees 
with some compartments losing 100%; there were upturned root plates (all in 
one direction) everywhere.
A decision was taken to remove trees and root plates, with the aim of 
restoring chalk grassland from the buried, viable, herb seedbank. What became 
clear, following, removal of the root plates was that what was visible (much 
like an iceberg) was just a part of the entire root area. The main part of 
each visible root plate was the woody, supporting parts whereas the dense mat 
of fibrous rooting was still in place - many, many yards beyond the woody 
roots.
Sean


-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info <uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> 
On Behalf Of Jerry Ross
Sent: 05 November 2019 09:22
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: Tree Root Literature

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It's all very well (or not) saying what size rootplate makes a tree stable, 
but what exactly IS a rootplate?
It seems to me that essentially it comprises the woody roots that remain 
attached to the tree when it uproots - in other words, it's largely an 
artefact of failure.
As such it's dependant on a host of factors, not only root morphology and 
their physical characteristics (which themselves are likely to vary widely 
with species) but also soil conditions, underground constraints that may 
affect root development, soil type (sandy, clayey, dry,
waterlogged) let alone disease, decay and of course climate and weather.
As Philip suggests, there are simply too many variable to allow simple rules 
to be applied with any confidence.




On 04/11/2019 18:11, Philip van Wassenaer wrote:
Every tree is different. This is very hard to standardize with so many 
variables with every tree you might look at.


Philip van Wassenaer, B.SC., MFC
Principal Consultant
Urban Forest Innovations Inc.
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
www.urbanforestinnovations.com



-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info
[mailto:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info] On Behalf Of Michael
Richardson
Sent: November-04-19 12:49 PM
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: Re: Tree Root Literature

All good choices.  I have gathered enough info for a basis of
understanding but now the issue is how does the soil, and specifically
the depth of rooting affect the stability of trees.

Mattheck and others have done some calculations with regards to
counter-weighting the sail.

I am now looking for a standardized protocol for assessing minimum
root plate required to maintain stability of the tree, both under
static and dynamic load.  I am particularly interested if there is a
protocol that discusses how soils and water should be evaluated and
what part they play in stability.

Michael Richardson B.Sc.F., BCMA
Ontario MTCU Qualified Arborist
Richardson Tree Care
Richardsontreecare.ca
613-475-2877
800-769-9183

   <http://www.richardsontreecare.ca/images/Tree_Doc_logo_email.png>



On Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 12:36 PM Mark Mackworth-Praed <
uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> wrote:

Hi Michael & Bill

The Mattheck/Breloer 'formula' for structural root plate radius
is/was
3.5-4.0 times trunk diameter - if I remember rightly, their argument
was that the fatter the tree, the more it relies on the dead weight
of its own trunk to support it, but I've always assumed the 4 X
diameter, in order to be on the safe side. The other paper that might
be worth looking at is Gasson and Cutler 'Tree Root Plate
Morphology', Arboricultural Journal 1990, Vol 14 No. 3, pp 193-264,
which analysed results from the Kew tree root survey following the
October 1987 storm in SE England. The tree species & soil types they
looked at might not be applicable/transferable to the case you're
looking at though, I guess, but it might be some help nonetheless.

Kind regards
Mark M-P

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info
<uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
On Behalf Of Bill Kowalczyk
Sent: 04 November 2019 13:31
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Tree Root Literature

Hi Michael

I remember (not so much these days!) about 20 years, or so, ago Claus
Mattheck came up with calculation for minimum rootplate diameter in
relation to stem size to maintain the structural integrity with
regards to wind-throw.

I don’t have my books to hand, but it might be a pointer in the right
direction…

Regards,

Bill

On 3 Nov 2019, at 12:41, Michael Richardson <
richardsontreecare@xxxxxx.com> wrote:


3) method of *visual* inspection to determine the size of root plate
necessary to remain stable under wind loads




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