UKTC Archive

Re: Tree Root Literature

Subject: Re: Tree Root Literature
From: Wayne Tyson
Date: Nov 07 2019 03:46:51
Sean's observation is correct; the system failed where the load exceeded
the resistance of the structure. And, of course, Rupert has hit the nail on
the head. The fine root normally are more firmly rooted into the soil
matrix than the root plate. Therefore, it is not the root plate that
resists the force, but the fine roots attached thereto.

Wayne

On Tue, Nov 5, 2019 at 2:00 AM Rupert Baker <rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk>
wrote:

Hi Jerry,
I see what you are saying;  but it is more than just the main woody roots;
it is the matrix of soil and roots - forming a composite like GRP with the
soil as the plastic and the roots as the glassfibre. My understanding from
talking to Claus about this a few years back is that rootplate failure
tends to take place at the (somewhat variable) radius outside the stem
where the root taper tends to zero and the roots continue on with a
cylindrical section.  He said that this zone is where rootplates tend to
fail along. So more or less by definition it is a characteristic of failure.
Atb
Rupert


-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info On Behalf Of Jerry Ross
Sent: 05 November 2019 09:22
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Tree Root Literature

It's all very well (or not) saying what size rootplate makes a tree
stable, but what exactly IS a rootplate?
It seems to me that essentially it comprises the woody roots that remain
attached to the tree when it uproots - in other words, it's largely an
artefact of failure.
As such it's dependant on a host of factors, not only root morphology and
their physical characteristics (which themselves are likely to vary widely
with species) but also soil conditions, underground constraints that may
affect root development, soil type (sandy, clayey, dry,
waterlogged) let alone disease, decay and of course climate and weather.
As Philip suggests, there are simply too many variable to allow simple
rules to be applied with any confidence.




On 04/11/2019 18:11, Philip van Wassenaer wrote:
Every tree is different. This is very hard to standardize with so many
variables with every tree you might look at.


Philip van Wassenaer, B.SC., MFC
Principal Consultant
Urban Forest Innovations Inc.
Mississauga, Ontario, Canada
www.urbanforestinnovations.com



-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info
[mailto:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info] On Behalf Of Michael
Richardson
Sent: November-04-19 12:49 PM
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: Re: Tree Root Literature

All good choices.  I have gathered enough info for a basis of
understanding but now the issue is how does the soil, and specifically
the depth of rooting affect the stability of trees.

Mattheck and others have done some calculations with regards to
counter-weighting the sail.

I am now looking for a standardized protocol for assessing minimum
root plate required to maintain stability of the tree, both under
static and dynamic load.  I am particularly interested if there is a
protocol that discusses how soils and water should be evaluated and
what part they play in stability.

Michael Richardson B.Sc.F., BCMA
Ontario MTCU Qualified Arborist
Richardson Tree Care
Richardsontreecare.ca
613-475-2877
800-769-9183

   <http://www.richardsontreecare.ca/images/Tree_Doc_logo_email.png>



On Mon, Nov 4, 2019 at 12:36 PM Mark Mackworth-Praed <
uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> wrote:

Hi Michael & Bill

The Mattheck/Breloer 'formula' for structural root plate radius
is/was
3.5-4.0 times trunk diameter - if I remember rightly, their argument
was that the fatter the tree, the more it relies on the dead weight
of its own trunk to support it, but I've always assumed the 4 X
diameter, in order to be on the safe side. The other paper that might
be worth looking at is Gasson and Cutler 'Tree Root Plate
Morphology', Arboricultural Journal 1990, Vol 14 No. 3, pp 193-264,
which analysed results from the Kew tree root survey following the
October 1987 storm in SE England. The tree species & soil types they
looked at might not be applicable/transferable to the case you're
looking at though, I guess, but it might be some help nonetheless.

Kind regards
Mark M-P

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info
<uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
On Behalf Of Bill Kowalczyk
Sent: 04 November 2019 13:31
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Tree Root Literature

Hi Michael

I remember (not so much these days!) about 20 years, or so, ago Claus
Mattheck came up with calculation for minimum rootplate diameter in
relation to stem size to maintain the structural integrity with
regards to wind-throw.

I don’t have my books to hand, but it might be a pointer in the right
direction…

Regards,

Bill

On 3 Nov 2019, at 12:41, Michael Richardson <
richardsontreecare@xxxxxx.com> wrote:


3) method of *visual* inspection to determine the size of root plate
necessary to remain stable under wind loads




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