UKTC Archive

RE: Windshield/Drive-by | Speed Limit

Subject: RE: Windshield/Drive-by | Speed Limit
From: oldoaktree
Date: Nov 26 2019 14:50:11
As someone who always finds that motorcycles make thing better, I always do 
my surveys on powered 2 wheels. 

I did a few rural estates this year, for all publically accessible areas. It 
is easy to stop at each tree without causing traffic chaos and a quick jump 
off to have a closer look is not hard (pains me to stay it but a step through 
ped would be even better- ride it on a car licence). After you've done the 
road you can do the field side easy enough without causing damage to crops or 
soils. You would need AT tyres for ploughed fields though!

So much easier to quickly come to a stop and have a ponder. Is good fun too!

Cheers

Dave

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info <uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> 
On Behalf Of dlj@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.com
Sent: 26 November 2019 10:43
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Windshield/Drive-by | Speed Limit

To have a look at the back of every tree that could fall onto the highway 
could bankrupt the state government.

Really?

OK, you have an unusual situation of low population density and long tree 
lined roads but even so your conclusion that walk by rather than drive by 
tree assessment could "bankrupt the Government" seems like a bit of a 
stretch, to me.

Hey, just thought of something.

What about Google Earth "Fly By" assessments?



On 2019-11-25 20:05, David Evans wrote:
<<It seems to me to be like scanning one side of a two sided piece of 
paper and believing that you know the whole story.>>

Hi David

There's no belief that they know the whole story.  The design is that 
one side of paper will be scanned at speed.

The context is Tasmania's Depart of State Growth has about 3700 miles 
of roads and millions of trees.  Trees provide many benefits that they 
need, and the overall risk from tree failure is extremely low.  Given 
this, to have a look at the back of every tree that could fall onto 
the highway is not reasonable, proportionate, or reasonably 
practicable tree risk-benefit management.  To do so might bankrupt the 
state government, or mean they couldn't provide many other important 
services.  The design is that they're trying to find 'obvious 
defects'.  To try and find defects that aren't obvious by looking at 
the back of each tree would be grossly disproportionate to the likely 
reduction in overall risk.

Cheers

Acer Ventura




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