UKTC Archive

Re: Tree hazard potential assessment study Standing dead trees

Subject: Re: Tree hazard potential assessment study Standing dead trees
From: Wayne Tyson
Date: Nov 27 2019 04:10:01
Seems reasonable to me. Sometimes it's revealing to post "interesting"
concepts.

Wayne

On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 7:39 PM Michael Richardson <
richardsontreecare@xxxxxx.com> wrote:

The most well known study on changes in ash due to EAB is likely:  Effects
of Emerald Ash Borer Infestation on the Structure and Material Properties
of Ash Trees, in Arboriculture & Urban Forestry 39(1): January 2013

Michael Richardson B.Sc.F., BCMA
Ontario MTCU Qualified Arborist
Richardson Tree Care
Richardsontreecare.ca
613-475-2877
800-769-9183

  <http://www.richardsontreecare.ca/images/Tree_Doc_logo_email.png>



On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 10:34 PM Michael Richardson <
richardsontreecare@xxxxxx.com> wrote:

Looking through the company's website and videos it is clear that their
inspection of trees is by eye-ball and all inspections result in one of
two
things 1) treat for EAB or 2) remove immediately.  The company is selling
services, and the services do not include tree inspection and assessment.

The claim that the trees are becoming brittle and failing does not hold a
lot of truth, the more likely scenario is that some trees are becoming
brittle and others are becoming soft.  EAB infested ash often fail at the
root plate due to decay of the roots and this has nothing to do with
dying
and brittle.

I think Wayne you can see that this company's website is not the place to
look for insight into tree inspection and assessment but rather is a good
place to look for how a tree service sells their services.

The way that I handle ash trees is to recognize that most will need
partial or entire removal if the owner wishes to reduce the likelihood of
failure and impact to nearly zero.  Thus municipalities and large land
owners I work with often want 100% removal along roads, high use trails,
and busy parks but they want the removals staggered over five to ten
years.  In these cases the answer is to prioritize based upon stage of
decline/decay and occupancy.  Others bury their head and only work on
responding to fallen trees.

Michael

Michael Richardson B.Sc.F., BCMA
Ontario MTCU Qualified Arborist
Richardson Tree Care
Richardsontreecare.ca
613-475-2877
800-769-9183

  <http://www.richardsontreecare.ca/images/Tree_Doc_logo_email.png>



On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 4:53 PM Wayne Tyson <wt750mv@xxxxxx.com> wrote:

I stumbled on the "dry" statement a bit too, but when the living tissue
stops functioning, and depending upon the specific case, I suppose it
could
be a correct observation of said case. Whether or not and how and when,
essentials in any complete analysis, might or might not support a
principle. Too bad they didn't mention the details more about processes.

Wayne

On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 1:13 PM Michael Richardson <
richardsontreecare@xxxxxx.com> wrote:

That is all very nice but how is the company testing the trees?
Sending an
arborist out to eyeball the tree and decide it needs to come down and
only
by them?

When you have studied EAB-killed ash you will realize that trees in
the
woods are quite different than trees in the front yard.  Drying is not
the
issue at the forest duff/trunk interface.



Michael Richardson B.Sc.F., BCMA
Ontario MTCU Qualified Arborist
Richardson Tree Care
Richardsontreecare.ca
613-475-2877
800-769-9183

  <http://www.richardsontreecare.ca/images/Tree_Doc_logo_email.png>



On Tue, Nov 26, 2019 at 1:49 PM Wayne Tyson <wt750mv@xxxxxx.com>
wrote:

This piece just showed up:
https://www.giroudtree.com/blog/dead-ash-trees-are-not-safe/

*No* standing dead tree is "safe." Oh, yes, yes, yes--dead and
defective
trees are "good for wildlife." BOTH statements are true.

But such trees also pose a significant problem for tree workers, and
the
longer the tree remains standing (while it continues to weaken from
decay),
the more dangerous it is to work on and around.

How do you ladies and gentlemen handle the overall issue?

Wayne



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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/




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The UK Tree Care mailing list
To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/