UKTC Archive

RE: Watering trees during the establishment phase

Subject: RE: Watering trees during the establishment phase
From: Jim Quaife
Date: Feb 10 2020 12:46:06
Years ago I transplanted a 5-metre tall Mexican pine [P.patula](hoicking it 
out of the ground with the very excavator that was going to mangle it).  It 
was mid-summer and so I used two 5-gallon plastic drums with small punctures 
so that the water drained out of them (one each side of the pit) in the 
course of a day - it was pure luck that the drainage rate was about right!
The tree shed a good many needles to start with but picked up and survived.  
I planted it in my then boss's front garden at Squerryes Court and it was 
growing well when about three years later the gardener knocked ¾ of the basal 
bark off with his tractor mower.  Decay set in and three years later it 
snapped off!

There is no need for anyone to comment . . .

Jim



-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info 
[mailto:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info] On Behalf Of AV Arboriculture
Sent: 10 February 2020 10:25
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: Re: Watering trees during the establishment phase

It's a dark art alright, but BS8545 does refer to some research in Annex G2:

"It is more important to irrigate transplanted trees frequently than to apply 
large volumes of water infrequently, as a single application of a large 
volume of water does not compensate for irrigating infrequently

Research has indicated that watering every other day with 4 L to 8 L of water 
for every 250 mm of stem diameter just above the root flare might provide the 
most even soil moisture for roots but this might be impractical to deliver.
Research has also indicated that in most climates, trees probably need to be 
watered about twice each week with 20 L of water adequate to keep an
800 mm diameter rootball well irrigated, and that 40 L of water or less 
thoroughly moistens a soil ball of 500 mm to 600 mm. The assessment of 
irrigation need can be assisted by the use of a simple soil moisture meter."

Mike Charkow 

[ mailto:info@xxxxxxx.co.uk | info@xxxxxxx.co.uk ] 
[ https://avtree.co.uk/ | www.avtree.co.uk ] 
07917XXXXXX 
Company Registration Number: SC413171

----- Original Message -----
From: "Brewster, Ian" <Ian.Brewster@xxxxxxx.co.uk>
To: "uktc" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Sent: Monday, 10 February, 2020 09:02:51
Subject: RE: Watering trees during the establishment phase

Apart from surviving the 1st year isnt the technique of watering to attract 
those newly planted trees and their roots into the deeper  soil towards quick 
establishment. I recall a local nursery being critical of mulching because 
they found it promotes surface rooting that would succumb to dry weather and 
drought conditions. So the spiral perforated pipes placed at the edges of the 
pit base supposedly 1.5x wider in diameter than the root ball is supposed to 
draw root growth into damp soils and prevent spiralling.
I recall a few Arb specs suggesting 13 weekly waterings throughout the June 
July August months to field capacity (to the tube top) with 40 litres. This 
presumably is based upon an expected pit size of 1x1.x0.5m cubic volume. Of 
course no watering if there has been a period of wet weather where the ground 
is moist. As others say knowing what the growing medium is would help with an 
understanding the nature of soil moisture retention and nutrient value. Free 
draining soils for example will likely require more water and those heavy 
clay soils less so.


Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
Apart from surviving the 1st year isnt the technique of watering to attract 
those newly planted trees and their roots into the deeper  soil towards quick 
establishment. I recall a local nursery being critical of mulching because 
they found it promotes surface rooting that would succumb to dry weather and 
drought conditions. So the spiral perforated pipes placed at the edges of the 
pit base supposedly 1.5x wider in diameter than the root ball is supposed to 
draw root growth into damp soils and prevent spiralling.
I recall a few Arb specs suggesting 13 weekly waterings throughout the June 
July August months to field capacity (to the tube top) with 40 litres. This 
presumably is based upon an expected pit size of 1x1.x0.5m cubic volume. Of 
course no watering if there has been a period of wet weather where the ground 
is moist. As others say knowing what the growing medium is would help with an 
understanding the nature of soil moisture retention and nutrient value. Free 
draining soils for example will likely require more water and those heavy 
clay soils less so.


Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: Wayne Tyson <wt750mv@xxxxxx.com>
Date: 10/02/2020 06:49 (GMT+00:00)
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Watering trees during the establishment phase

A probe will pick up wetness, and any odor will indicate anaerobic
conditions. It's all about having *available* water per *cubic* unit of
measure.

Calculations need to consider the amount of available water present, and
the AWC known. The biggest mistake in tree irrigation is not getting water
down deep enough, at least in these parts.

Wayne
NPS
 -------- Original message --------
From: Wayne Tyson <wt750mv@xxxxxx.com>
Date: 10/02/2020 06:49 (GMT+00:00)
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Watering trees during the establishment phase

A probe will pick up wetness, and any odor will indicate anaerobic
conditions. It's all about having *available* water per *cubic* unit of
measure.

Calculations need to consider the amount of available water present, and
the AWC known. The biggest mistake in tree irrigation is not getting water
down deep enough, at least in these parts.

Wayne



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The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/



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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/