UKTC Archive

Re: Tree Risk Management - Taking the defect out of it

Subject: Re: Tree Risk Management - Taking the defect out of it
From: Julian Morris
Date: Feb 11 2020 09:17:16
Hold on, are we talkign about mechanical stress (force per area) or 
physiological? Or both?

Julian A. Morris - Professional Tree Services
jamtrees.co.uk  and  highhedgesscotland.com
0778 XXX XXXX - 0141 XXX XXXX


Sent: Tuesday, February 11, 2020 at 9:07 AM
From: "AV Arboriculture" <mike@xxxxxxx.co.uk>
To: "UK Tree Care" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Tree Risk Management - Taking the defect out of it

It seems to me that he's saying the stress component comes in later in the 
tree development and leads two irreversible decline or resilience.

Mike Charkow 


----- Original Message -----
From: "Wayne Tyson" <wt750mv@xxxxxx.com>
To: "uktc" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Sent: Monday, 10 February, 2020 18:25:34
Subject: Re: Tree Risk Management - Taking the defect out of it

Joye's diagram seems reasonable to me, but the role of stress in both
extremes is a bit unclear. In the early stages, stress results in
strengthening; in the later stages, in decline. I believe that may be what
he's trying to say, but I'm not certain.

Wayne

On Mon, Feb 10, 2020 at 9:46 AM AV Arboriculture <mike@xxxxxxx.co.uk> wrote:

Tom Joye is well worth a read, for a different way of looking at a tree's
life cycle.  I've attached his drawing of a tree's development stages.

Mike Charkow


----- Original Message -----
From: "Wayne Tyson" <wt750mv@xxxxxx.com>
To: "uktc" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Sent: Thursday, 6 February, 2020 11:42:59
Subject: Re: Tree Risk Management - Taking the defect out of it

If one were to graph the tree's lifetime, the upward trend toward
increasing well-being might be thought of as peaking, leveling off, then
declining. Those stages might be seen in some species and/or conditions as
being short or long in time, as in, say, an *Acacia* sp. or in a Sequoia.
The Great Basin bristlecone pine, for example, can remain in a declining
state for a very long time. There are a lot of variables, and the truth is
in the details.

Wayne

On Thu, Feb 6, 2020 at 3:11 AM AV Arboriculture <mike@xxxxxxx.co.uk> 
wrote:

Yes, me too.  I meant use the life stage numbers, rather then the terms
ancient and so on.

Regards,

Mike Charkow
Principal Arboriculturist
______________________
Arbor Vitae Arboriculture Ltd

Planning surveys, Tree inspections, Bats in trees inspections,
Arboricultural consultancy, Soil de-compaction, Root Investigation,
Woodland Management.

[ mailto:info@xxxxxxx.co.uk | info@xxxxxxx.co.uk ]
[ https://avtree.co.uk/ | www.avtree.co.uk ]
07917XXXXXX
Company Registration Number: SC413171

----- Original Message -----
From: "Stephen Hayden" <StephenHayden@xxxxxxxxxxxx.co.uk>
To: "uktc" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Sent: Thursday, 6 February, 2020 10:50:52
Subject: Re: Tree Risk Management - Taking the defect out of it

One could, but personally I am weary of the using ‘Ancient’  in the
almost
ubiquitous nature with which it is banded about arboriculture nowadays,
it
is far to vague and emotive, and as Kevin alluded to earlier, is often
misused within the planning system.


On 6 Feb 2020, at 10:24, AV Arboriculture <mike@xxxxxxx.co.uk> wrote:

We could adopt a version of Neville Fay's Morpho-physiological stages
(page 22):



http://www.ancienttreeforum.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Trees-a-lifespan-approach-Nev-Fay-et-al.pdf

Regards,

Mike Charkow
Principal Arboriculturist
______________________
Arbor Vitae Arboriculture Ltd

Planning surveys, Tree inspections, Bats in trees inspections,
Arboricultural consultancy, Soil de-compaction, Root Investigation,
Woodland Management.

[ mailto:info@xxxxxxx.co.uk | info@xxxxxxx.co.uk ]
[ https://avtree.co.uk/ | www.avtree.co.uk ]
07917XXXXXX
Company Registration Number: SC413171

----- Original Message -----
From: "Stephen Hayden" <StephenHayden@xxxxxxxxxxxx.co.uk>
To: "uktc" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Sent: Thursday, 6 February, 2020 10:16:39
Subject: Re: Tree Risk Management - Taking the defect out of it

Senescent does imply ultimate death but I would suggest it is the 
phase
following the trees optimal growth & vitality prior to natural, not
induced, decline, one could use  ‘Ageing’ as it refers to degenerative
changes that occur in all organisms without any reference to death, 
while
‘senescence' might imply the developmental stage at which close to 
death'
symptoms becomes apparent.  Given the regenerative powers of some trees
through vegetative propagation and management practices such as
coppicing,
pollarding and layering, one word for the processes of decline seems a
little restrictive. Each to their own maybe.

Regards



[cid:image001.jpg@01D03F9E.FF775E20]


Stephen Hayden
Principal



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The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
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