UKTC Archive

Re: Aims and Objectives of Tree Management

Subject: Re: Aims and Objectives of Tree Management
From: Wayne Tyson
Date: Feb 29 2020 03:05:39
Congratulations to Andrew for considering the safety of his crew (and
himself) first. This appears to be a classic case of waiting too long
(until the tree is too dangerous to work on, in, under, or around). I would
NEVER send a crew anywhere near that tree. The fault does not lie with
Andrew. If I were the tree professional, I would decline to do the work.
This also is a classic case of why tree professionals need to be involved
throughout the life of the tree. If the client has neglected to properly
maintain its trees, that's the client's problem, and inexcusable
mismanagement on the part of any tree professional who perhaps should have
advised the client with respect to the proper management of the tree years
or decades ago. Most likely, the decision to keep putting off the
inevitable was on the part of some "manager" who was penny wise and pound
foolish. Yet another case of taking trees for granted and neglecting them?
The world needs more and better tree professionals and fewer chain-saw
ripoffers.

Wayne

On Fri, Feb 28, 2020 at 1:46 PM Andrew McManus <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
wrote:

I have a relavent live situation.Surveying a 11kV powerline for trees that
need cutting to achieve a 5m clearance, I came across two badly decayed
larch trees in a mature mixed woodland beside a 11kV powerline cat B so
taller than the conductors and with the potential to breach the vicinity
zone, (and also hit the conductors) They have failed and are each hung up
(leaning at about 20deg to vertical) reasonably securely in adjacent beech
trees but in a direction 45deg towards the powerline.  The decision to be
decided is is it more dangerous (to the tree cutters) to fell the trees or
is the risk to the network and to the very occasional visitor of leaving
the larches to disintigrate naturally greater.  It is case specific and
finely balanced.To fell them I do not like the idea of cutting them with a
chainsaw because of the risk of them breaking apart and hitting me. And any
pull rope to prevent them hitting the conductors may not work as the rotten
trees break apart.One approved method that avoids the risk of a manual
chainsaw operator being hit might be to winch them out, but the possibility
of the tree breaking and falling onto the powerline means a shutdown and
even lowering the conductors would be indicated. The high monetary costs
and risks to the linesmen of doing this must be considered.The alternative
is to leave the larches to disintigrate naturally and hope the main trunks
do not free themselves from the embŕace ot the supporting beech trees in a
length long enough to hit the powerline.  It is a private woodland where I
saw no one else on my two visits during office hours. It is unlikely anyone
would be present to be harmed by any falling tree or broken powerline. The
risk of harm from an interuption in electrical supply are unknown.I can see
the case for leaving the larch trees to disintigrate naturally. I suspect
we will be asked to remove them. I recon the comparitive risks will be
evaluated as much by emotion rather than by reason.Andrew
-------- Original message --------From: Tom Thompson <
admin@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.co.uk> Date: 28/02/2020  13:07  (GMT+00:00) To: UK
Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> Subject: Re: Aims and Objectives of
Tree Management I don't remember that but the comments about risk to
contractors got methinking.We have a very low risk of ha or damage to
property and we are trying toget it to close to zero.We are not considering
the impact to health and mental health of the lossor reduction of trees and
we are not considering the risk to thecontractors doing the work.The last
contractor death I can remember was in Croydon.  The guy gut hisneck while
up a tree, I believe doing a reduction rather than felling anobviously
decay and compromised tree. There was another one in south Lomdonsomewhere
I think.Just got me thinking are we looking at the big picture or focusing
in onthe tree surgery straight away.Sincerely TomI S Tom Thompson (known as
Tom) BSc (Hons) Arb, MSc eFor, MArborAPrincipal Arboricultural
ConsultantArbor Cultural Ltd36 Central Avenue, West Molesey, Surrey, KT8
2QZT   0333 XXX XXXXM  07899 XXXXXXE   Admin@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.co.ukW
www.arbor-cultural.co.ukOn Thu, 27 Feb 2020, 5:10 pm Jonathan Hazell, <
go2jonathan.hazell@xxxxxx.com>wrote:> I remember Clive Mayhew talking
about something akin to this at an AA> conference years ago>> Jonathan>> On
Thu, 27 Feb 2020 at 17:03, Tom Thompson <admin@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.co.uk>>
wrote:>> > Dear All> >> > This is prompted by the recent discussion on the
risk of harm or damage> to> > property from trees against the risk of
commissioning tree work and the> > inherent danger therein.> >> > I was not
thinking of the extremes that were highlighted but more the> > marginal
decisions and pose this question.> >> > Is our aim/objective (or another
descriptor to suit) to;> >> > The better management of trees> >> > Or> >> >
To create a safer, healthier environment through the better management of>
trees.> >> > The former in my mind/experience leads to more tree
pruning.> > The latter more an assessment of the overall value of trees,> >
including ecosystem services etc.> >> > Sincerely Tom> >> > I S Tom
Thompson (known as Tom) BSc (Hons) Arb, MSc eFor, MArborA> >> > Principal
Arboricultural Consultant> > Arbor Cultural Ltd> >> > 36 Central Avenue,
West Molesey, Surrey, KT8 2QZ> >> > T   0333 XXX XXXX> > M  07899 XXXXXX> >
E   Admin@xxxxxxxxxxxxxxx.co.uk> > W  www.arbor-cultural.co.uk> >> >> >> >
--> > The UK Tree Care mailing list> > To unsubscribe send mailto:
uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> >> > The UKTC is supported by
Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy> > http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/>
-->> Thank you,>> Jonathan Hazell> 07501 XXXXXX> jhazell.com>>>> -->
The UK Tree Care mailing list> To unsubscribe send mailto:
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Trees arboricultural consultancy> http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/>-- The UK
Tree Care mailing listTo unsubscribe send mailto:
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