UKTC Archive

RE: Subsidence and Sweet chestnut roots DNA

Subject: RE: Subsidence and Sweet chestnut roots DNA
From: Alastair Durkin
Date: Apr 21 2020 14:35:42
Well that’s very interesting Jon, I hadn't thought about it like that.


-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info <uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> 
On Behalf Of Jon Heuch
Sent: 21 April 2020 14:47
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Subsidence and Sweet chestnut roots DNA

Are you sure they are testing for DNA?

 

It sounds like you are getting the standard anatomical identification which 
cannot easily differentiate (or at least with certainty) between oak and 
sweet chestnut.

 

The reason I say that, apart from the company standardly doing DNA tree root 
testing going out of business last year, is that there were two completely 
different DNA tests going on...different techniques, different machines & 
different costs.

 

The standard test would test root specimens against twigs, so to match the 
roots to an individual tree. The DNA test would depend upon you telling the 
lab that the tree was an oak. They would then use the appropriate methodology 
for oaks to see if any of the roots matched the oak tree for which you had 
provided twigs. They would not be able to confirm that the tree was an oak, 
as opposed to any other species. If the root you provided samples of was not 
an oak, all you would get back is that it was not a match for your oak tree 
twig.

 

If you provided the lab with a root & asked them what species it came from 
they would have to do something completely different..& it's always been a 
lot quicker and cheaper to ask an anatomical botanist to provide that 
information.

 

Jon 

 




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