UKTC Archive

RE: Chitalpa x tashkentensis

Subject: RE: Chitalpa x tashkentensis
From: Brewster, Ian
Date: May 21 2020 17:27:17
All reputable nurseries are expected to follow strict plant passport rules, 
restrictions and regulations to screen/quaranteen/destroy suspect stock 
including those at Barchams. The initial question was to find out whether 
others have experience of this tree  in particular if there are existing 
examples that have reached suitable heights to warrant its introduction into 
the street scene, in my case the south of the UK highways.

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
All reputable nurseries are expected to follow strict plant passport rules, 
restrictions and regulations to screen/quaranteen/destroy suspect stock 
including those at Barchams. The initial question was to find out whether 
others have experience of this tree  in particular if there are existing 
examples that have reached suitable heights to warrant its introduction into 
the street scene, in my case the south of the UK highways.

Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.


-------- Original message --------
From: Rupert Baker <rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk>
Date: 21/05/2020 18:05 (GMT+00:00)
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: RE: Chitalpa x tashkentensis

Re Xylella -
If there is any chance that they are or could be carriers, they should be 
avoided at all costs!
We have had too many horrible plant pandemics - as well as the current 
mammalian one - to want any more, just to 'get away from Rosaceae'

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info On Behalf Of Jerry Ross
Sent: 21 May 2020 16:26
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Chitalpa x tashkentensis

What do we all make of this, from Wikipedia:

"× Chitalpa is dry-spell tolerant and fast-growing (some meters or several 
feet a year to 6–9 m or 20–30 ft) and blooms between late spring and late 
fall.[4] Cultivars include: 'Pink Dawn' with pink flowers, 'Morning Cloud' 
with white and pale pink blooms, and a recent addition, "Summer Bells 
Minsum." It a deciduous tree, branching readily near its base and with 
ascending branches that form a dense, broad oval crown. It is also highly 
drought-resistant, a trait inherited from the desert willow. Chitalpa are 
also carriers of the Xylella Fastidioas .....
...Two types of trees called Chitalpa were created as hybrids by A.
Rusanov of the Botanic Garden of the Uzbek Academy of Sciences in Uzbekistan 
(then part of the Soviet Union) in 1964. They were introduced in the US by 
Robert Hebb of the New York Botanic Garden in 1977.
Unbeknownst to the scientist, the Chilopsis used for the hybrid was infected 
with the virus Xylella Fastidiosa. Due to the fact that all Chitalpas today 
were bred from the original root stock, all species have the virus."

Apart from the spelling error and the apparent confusion between bacterium 
and virus, can it be that all plants of this species, which are currently 
widely available, are all infected
NPS
 -------- Original message --------
From: Rupert Baker <rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk>
Date: 21/05/2020 18:05 (GMT+00:00)
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: RE: Chitalpa x tashkentensis

Re Xylella -
If there is any chance that they are or could be carriers, they should be 
avoided at all costs!
We have had too many horrible plant pandemics - as well as the current 
mammalian one - to want any more, just to 'get away from Rosaceae'

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info On Behalf Of Jerry Ross
Sent: 21 May 2020 16:26
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Chitalpa x tashkentensis

What do we all make of this, from Wikipedia:

"× Chitalpa is dry-spell tolerant and fast-growing (some meters or several 
feet a year to 6–9 m or 20–30 ft) and blooms between late spring and late 
fall.[4] Cultivars include: 'Pink Dawn' with pink flowers, 'Morning Cloud' 
with white and pale pink blooms, and a recent addition, "Summer Bells 
Minsum." It a deciduous tree, branching readily near its base and with 
ascending branches that form a dense, broad oval crown. It is also highly 
drought-resistant, a trait inherited from the desert willow. Chitalpa are 
also carriers of the Xylella Fastidioas .....
...Two types of trees called Chitalpa were created as hybrids by A.
Rusanov of the Botanic Garden of the Uzbek Academy of Sciences in Uzbekistan 
(then part of the Soviet Union) in 1964. They were introduced in the US by 
Robert Hebb of the New York Botanic Garden in 1977.
Unbeknownst to the scientist, the Chilopsis used for the hybrid was infected 
with the virus Xylella Fastidiosa. Due to the fact that all Chitalpas today 
were bred from the original root stock, all species have the virus."

Apart from the spelling error and the apparent confusion between bacterium 
and virus, can it be that all plants of this species, which are currently 
widely available, are all infected



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