UKTC Archive

RE: Chitalpa x tashkentensis

Subject: RE: Chitalpa x tashkentensis
From: Philip Wilson
Date: May 22 2020 06:13:19
After a bit of mooching on the internet I notice that the USDA says of sweet 
orange:

'In some severely diseased groves, individual trees are sometimes observed to 
be infected by Xylella fastidiosa without showing severe disease symptoms', 
apparently owing to a bacterial antagonist, and (in an early US reference) 
peach trees infected with Xylella have shortened internodes but otherwise 
healthy foliage (originally called ponies, hence 'phony disease of peach'). 
Some diseases are also endophytes, like sooty bark disease, that requires a 
hot dry summer to develop.

So non-specific or occult symptoms, or no symptoms at all, seem quite 
plausible. How our phytosanitary people deal with that is a question for them.
Philip



-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info 
[mailto:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info] On Behalf Of Jerry Ross
Sent: 21 May 2020 16:26
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: Re: Chitalpa x tashkentensis

What do we all make of this, from Wikipedia:

"× Chitalpa is dry-spell tolerant and fast-growing (some meters or 
several feet a year to 6–9 m or 20–30 ft) and blooms between late spring 
and late fall.[4] Cultivars include: 'Pink Dawn' with pink flowers, 
'Morning Cloud' with white and pale pink blooms, and a recent addition, 
"Summer Bells Minsum." It a deciduous tree, branching readily near its 
base and with ascending branches that form a dense, broad oval crown. It 
is also highly drought-resistant, a trait inherited from the desert 
willow. Chitalpa are also carriers of the Xylella Fastidioas .....
...Two types of trees called Chitalpa were created as hybrids by A. 
Rusanov of the Botanic Garden of the Uzbek Academy of Sciences in 
Uzbekistan (then part of the Soviet Union) in 1964. They were introduced 
in the US by Robert Hebb of the New York Botanic Garden in 1977.
Unbeknownst to the scientist, the Chilopsis used for the hybrid was 
infected with the virus Xylella Fastidiosa. Due to the fact that all 
Chitalpas today were bred from the original root stock, all species have 
the virus."

Apart from the spelling error and the apparent confusion between 
bacterium and virus, can it be that all plants of this species, which 
are currently widely available, are all infected with Xylella??






On 21/05/2020 16:08, Bill Anderson wrote:
Pete Thurman pointed out to me some years ago, that catalpa needs a lot of
sunshine, hence it does OK in the southeast, less so in less sunny bits of
the UK. Up here in Sheffield, it struggles to get to be much more than a
big shrub. That said I've seen a couple flowering in the last couple of
years, so I don't know whether that's telling us something about the
climate.
Curiously if you head further east from here towards Humberside you'll see
better Catalpas; I found a good one in Hatfield, which is northeast of
me but still in Doncaster. The locals in Doncaster know the climate's
better out east. Spurn Head despite sticking out into the permanently
near-frozen North Sea always seems clement as well. At least whenever I've
been there.
The online photos of Chitalpa (with which I'm completely unfamiliar) don't
make it look like a good street tree.

On Thu, 21 May 2020 at 13:28, Philip Wilson <philip@xxxxxx.com> wrote:

Jerry, I notice from your OSU link that, presumably in the US:

'Clone no. 1 of the cross was named ‘Pink Dawn’, it is the most commonly
sold selection.  ‘Morning Cloud’ (Clone No. 2) is also available; it has
pale pink to white flowers, is more upright, and grows larger than ‘Pink
Dawn’'

Bearing in mind that Catalpa is a big tree (I notice also two subspecies
and various cultivars of Chilopsis), and that tree breeding in Tashkent was
no doubt for Uzbek conditions, perhaps there's scope for breeding our own
cultivars - if that hasn't been done yet.
Philip


-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info [mailto:
uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info] On Behalf Of Jerry Ross
Sent: 21 May 2020 12:59
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: Re: Chitalpa x tashkentensis

Same here - ours is a bit younger and about the same (3m) high, but
multi-stemmed and distinctly more shrub- than tree-like.
However Barchams seem to be able to train them up:
https://www.barcham.co.uk/products/chitalpa-summer-bells/ - And they do
well in the States (see attached - from Oregon
https://landscapeplants.oregonstate.edu/plants/chitalpa-tashkentensis-pink-dawn
)
Barchams say it's "hardy to the UK climate and best planted with a
sheltered aspect, in full sun", although ours has tended to be knocked back
by late frosts.



On 21/05/2020 11:39, Topher Martyn wrote:
I've got one here, which is about 10 years old, and only about 3m high.

For me its more bushy/shrubby than upright.

Topher

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info
<uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> On Behalf Of Brewster, Ian
Sent: 21 May 2020 11:25
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Chitalpa x tashkentensis

There is a consideration to plant a varied mix other than typical
ornamental Rosaceae varieties to try and build resilience within our
exiting Highway tree stock. The ‘Desert Willow’ is being considered and
wondered if anyone had experience of it, for example will it reach heights
to accommodate the average vehicle size and tolerant of urban
life/environment, as a street tree?
There is a consideration to plant a varied mix other than typical
ornamental Rosaceae varieties to try and build resilience within our
exiting Highway tree stock. The ‘Desert Willow’ is being considered and
wondered if anyone had experience of it, for example will it reach heights
to accommodate the average vehicle size and tolerant of urban
life/environment, as a street tree?
NPS




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The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/




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To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy
http://www.boskytrees.co.uk/