UKTC Archive

RE: the plasticity of oak trees

Subject: RE: the plasticity of oak trees
From: Rupert Baker
Date: Jun 28 2020 17:14:32
Hi John, Ian,
It is on the tidal Dart estuary in S Devon; where I grew up - lucky me! 
(though I couldn’t afford to live there myself now).
When I have been down on the Helford woods, either for the launch of Olly 
Rackham's posthumously published book, or at other times on hols, I haven’t 
seen any like the ones photo'd; which may be down to the differing geology. 
The rocks  that part of the Dart are hard- Ashprington Volcanics and 
associated sedimentary rocks, which have been metamorphosed; the rocks cleave 
along natural bedding planes, which may allow a slow rate of erosion. - the 
bedrock the Helford runs through is Middle Devonian shillets/mudstones, so 
quite a lot softer; though I see the bedrock at Hayling etc is Chalk!
One curious thing I have noticed over the years is that, at least in summer, 
the salinity in the estuary tends to be higher than in the sea - presumably 
because river flows of fresh water are low, and there is evaporation from the 
extensive mud-flats at low tide. The foliage of the oaks (and other trees) 
gets a clear 'browse-line' from the salt at high tide, but some of the more 
slumped trees have their bases inundated at high tides, several days either 
side of full spring tides, so maybe 24+ times a month. They don’t seem to 
take much harm from it; and where trees fall onto the foreshore, and remain 
alive with roots back into the bank, you have the odd site of live, foliaged 
oak branches growing out of salt water at high tide
Atb
Rupert

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info On Behalf Of Brewster, Ian
Sent: 28 June 2020 12:17
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: RE: the plasticity of oak trees

Hi Rupert, excellent post. We have similar around Hayling, Bosham and 
Chidham. Possible remnants of ancient boundaries. Is the estuary 
salt/intertidal?


Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.
Hi Rupert, excellent post. We have similar around Hayling, Bosham and 
Chidham. Possible remnants of ancient boundaries. Is the estuary 
salt/intertidal?


Sent from my Samsung Galaxy smartphone.



-------- Original message --------
From: Rupert Baker <rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk>
Date: 28/06/2020 12:01 (GMT+00:00)
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: the plasticity of oak trees

Dear All,

I was intrigued by a series of oak trees growing along the edge of a tidal 
estuary. I have known these trees since I was a child, but never really 
thought about what I was looking at. However, looking at them through an 
arborists eyes, they are very strange indeed; they have slumped under their 
wight/gravitational load, as the bank has been eroded beneath them, and 
changed shape; the oldest now have their bases some 3m below the original 
level; the trees' buttresses and root systems changing shape under load, 
whilst keeping the trees upright.

I'm hoping that this time you will be able to view the photos in this flickr 
album I've set up for the purpose; the photos are described 1,2 etc with 
brief descriptions.

See link below.

Trees are a constant surprise!

Atb

Rupert



https://www.flickr.com/gp/189086679@N02/40109G<https://www.flickr.com/gp/189086679@N02/40109G>




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https://www.stockholmtreepits.co.uk<https://www.stockholmtreepits.co.uk>
NPS
 -------- Original message --------
From: Rupert Baker <rupert_baker@xxxxxxxx.co.uk>
Date: 28/06/2020 12:01 (GMT+00:00)
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: the plasticity of oak trees

Dear All,

I was intrigued by a series of oak trees growing along the edge of a tidal 
estuary. I have known these trees since I was a child, but never really 
thought about what I was looking at. However, looking at them through an 
arborists eyes, they are very strange indeed; they have slumped under their 
wight/gravitational load, as the bank has been eroded beneath them, and 
changed shape; the oldest now have their bases some 3m below the original 
level; the trees' buttresses and root systems changing shape under load, 
whilst keeping the trees upright.

I'm hoping that this time you will be able to view the photos in this flickr 
album I've set up for the purpose; the photos are described 1,2 etc with 
brief descriptions.

See link below.

Trees are a constant surprise!

Atb

Rupert



https://www.flickr.com/gp/189086679@N02/40109G<https://www.flickr.com/gp/189086679@N02/40109G>




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The UK Tree Care mailing list
To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC forum is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy and 
Stockholm Tree Pits 
https://www.stockholmtreepits.co.uk<https://www.stockholmtreepits.co.uk>



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The UK Tree Care mailing list
To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC forum is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy and 
Stockholm Tree Pits https://www.stockholmtreepits.co.uk




-- 
The UK Tree Care mailing list
To unsubscribe send mailto:uktc-unsubscribe@xxxxxx.tree-care.info

The UKTC forum is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy and
Stockholm Tree Pits
https://www.stockholmtreepits.co.uk