UKTC Archive

RE: Natives vs future

Subject: RE: Natives vs future
From: Rupert Baker
Date: Oct 25 2020 13:13:56
I always understood it had 'taken the wrong turning - if you look at a map of 
western California, there is a big ridge running NNW/SSE just inland from the 
peninsula; preventing easy transfer eastwards and then on northwards. Or it 
may be that some cohorts of P. radiata and C. macrocarpa carried on 
northwards and died out for whatever reason, leaving the small relic 
population at the tip of the peninsula. (Along with Pinus torreyana IIRC).

The late great Alan Mitchell comments re P. radiata - "shows extraordinary 
vigour and peculiar timing; has grown annual shoots to 2.5m/yr  in UK, not 
setting a dormant bud; and in NZ reached 60m in 40 years"...
Similarly, re ecosystems and where organisms are native to; there was an 
interesting comment from Charlie Burrell (of rewilding Knepp estate fame) at 
his lecture to our SW Division RFS winter lecture last winter - that current 
prescriptions for the ideal habitat for organisms, if they were based on our 
current mostly altered and degraded ecosystems, were often wrong - instancing 
the mass of purple emperor butterflies that turned up at Knepp and weren’t 
confined to the tops of Oaks. His point was that if you are only looking at 
where things live now, they may be confined there by competition or lack of 
access to more favourable habitats where they would flourish better
Atb
Rupert


-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info On Behalf Of Roderick Leslie
Sent: 25 October 2020 09:33
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Re: Natives vs future


I've been there and it's fascinating - as you say, Simon, the Monterey Pine 
is pretty awful in its tiny native range - is it the most planted tree in 
nthe world now ? the staple of plantation forestry right across the warm 
temperate zones of the world. But I'm not sure it's topography that trapped 
the two species - I'd always assumed it was a drying climate that cut them 
off - do you think thats right ?

Rod Leslie

------ Original Message ------
From: "Simon Pryce Arboriculture" <info@xxxxxxxxxxx.co.uk>
To: "UK Tree Care" <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Sent: Saturday, 24 Oct, 20 At 23:31
Subject: Re: Natives vs future
One barrier to northward spread in N America is the Monterey Peninsula, which 
sticks out into the Pacific, so Monterey pines and cypresses have been stuck 
there and don't grow as well in their "native" habitat as the ones that 
escaped to Bournemouth and other more hospitable climes with human assistance.
Simon


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The UKTC forum is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy and
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