UKTC Archive

RE: Sparassis crispa on Scots pine

Subject: RE: Sparassis crispa on Scots pine
From: Rupert Baker
Date: Jan 14 2021 11:05:40
______________________________________________________________________
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-Trees & decay fungi: a new approach. -THREATS
-Forensic entomology. -Decision-making & tree work for risk control
-Tree morphology & retrenchment pruning. -RAVEN
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Hi Jasper, I'd be fairly relaxed about it; there is also a thread on UKTC 
some years back about it where a member posted that they'd be harvesting the 
fruit bodies from a pine over a number of years; and were not very concerned 
re its stability - the tree that is - can't remember which spp of pine, though
Atb
Rupert
Ps I took a copy of some of the correspondence back then and kept it on my 
'bits off UKTC' folder - an ideal resource for CPD! - see below, though I'm 
not sure if it was the same thread as referred to above - dated 29/9/2008: 

"Sparassis Crispa

Hi Dom,

In my opinion, if the Pine has Sparassis appearing all over the place then 
the tree's not worth trying to retain.  Mattheck, Schearze and Strouts and 
Winter make little reference to it. Lonsdale considers it somewhat 
negligable. However, it enters through damaged roots and causes a brown rot 
of the heart wood of both stem and roots and, can extend up up into the stem 
for over a metre. Lonsdale says it doesn't necessarilly lead to catasrophic 
failure, but the trees are usually in dcline for other reasons. 

Very often it is accompanied by Phaeolus. I would say its not worth further 
invetigation, as its habit is known and the trees condition won't improve.

Ron.

It wasn't my question Ron - but I'm inclined to agree, I've only seen it on 
trees I had to condemn.  Once saw it associated with a 'T' shaped crack, the 
external ribs of which were obscured by the mile thick Mo pine bark, with 
decay in the crack extending up to 3-4m.  The crack was the problem rather 
than the decay though.

Dom

Chris Widdicombe
There is a very large 30m Specimen Monterey Pine located in the formal garden 
at Saltram House (NT) property on the outskirts of Plymouth, which has had 
the disease for around 6 years that I'm aware of, the sporophore/fruiting 
body appears at the base of the main stem/root crown area only, or at least 
it did the last time I looked at it around two years ago now.

The tree is in a very exposed location and was not showing any signs of 
decline, apart from the usual small amounts of minor dead wood throughout the 
crown.

Bill kowalyck
I regularly go back to a very large Douglas Fir to pick S. crispa for supper 
although last week the slugs had got there first. I've been picking it more 
than 10 years now from this tree. The tree is near a highway (on County owned 
land) so I assume it obviously gets regularly inspected, but there are still 
no obvious signs of decline/ dieback etc.

best regards,
Bill



-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info On Behalf Of Jasper Fulford-Dobson
Sent: 14 January 2021 10:41
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Sparassis crispa on Scots pine

______________________________________________________________________
FLAC. The Seminar, 2021. 2 days, 8 lectures, 11 hours world-class CPD 
-Philosophy of tree risk assessment. -Practical hazard identification -Trees 
& decay fungi: a new approach. -THREATS -Forensic entomology. 
-Decision-making & tree work for risk control -Tree morphology & retrenchment 
pruning. -RAVEN
13-14 May, Forest of Arden Marriott; 20-21 May, Dundee Uni Botanics Please 
email enquiries@xxxxx.uk.com to register interest 
______________________________________________________________________

Dear collective,

Does anyone have experience of observing Cauliflower fungus on Scots pine 
over a number of years or even better have tomograms or resistance drilling 
measurements they can share (confidentially of course)?

I can think of maybe 3-4 previous times where I have formally recorded this 
particular fungi over a 30 year period and the circumstances did not warrant 
any further investigation. However, yesterday I recorded one on a huge Scots 
pine (d: 116cm & h: 28m), which is within falling distance of two roads and a 
house. The foliage/needle density appeared to be slightly thinning compared 
to a neighbouring Scotty.  Also, I was somewhat surprised to see the fruiting 
mass at this time of year.

I'm sure there will be others out there who have a better understanding of 
this fungi than me and I'd be really grateful for any shared experiences from 
the forum.

Many thanks in advance.



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