UKTC Archive

Re: Biodiversity value of a private garden lawn?

Subject: Re: Biodiversity value of a private garden lawn?
From: Wayne Tyson
Date: Nov 16 2021 21:15:25
Well said. However, "nature" doesn't "need" us, or for that matter any
other species.

“Ecosystems are not only more complex than we think, they are more complex
than we *can *think.” --Frank Egler


WT

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 10:16 PM Antony Croft <
rositsavalleyangling@xxxxxx.com> wrote:

eWFLEL
There are paradoxes, many of them surrounding our ideas of what nature
needs. We all too often think we are a negative force in the world and that
if we just left the scene altogether life would thrive. The reality is that
despite the plant fancieing gardeners choices there are many aspects,
within the older generations that actually increase the biodiversity
potential and quality of the habitats within the urban sprawl. Old now
neglected fruit trees full of saproxylic habitat, mossy lawns full of wax
caps, grass clippings poled up and providing warm rotting sanctuaries for
slow worms and indeed their food supply. seedheads bird boxes and feeders.

The modern garden is of poor quality it has to be said, the policy of new
build builders/developers is to scrape evey ounce of soil down to its base
and at the end lay a facade of greenery over the top like a bandaid with
hearts on it, looks lovely but hids a rape of the earth that has about as
much natural empathy as a nucluer test program.



On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 11:31 PM Wayne Tyson <wt750mv@xxxxxx.com> wrote:

While I'm not absolutely certain about the statistics, I quite agree with
your remarks about agriculture. I hope you will consider writing a piece
for a newspaper of wide circulation. This commonly ignored fact needs to
become more widely known.

As for gardens, while I am happy to hear on good mycological authority
that
(presumably indigenous?) fungi have become established, it would be
interesting to know how the entire garden microbiome compares with that
of
adjacent wilds. Gardens, by definition, are collections of plants fancied
by the gardener, not necessarily those of an indigenous ecosystem.

WT

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 9:21 AM Antony Croft <
rositsavalleyangling@xxxxxx.com>
wrote:

As a fungal ecologist it always surprised me how many rare (supposedly,
due
to lack of records) fungi would be found in the older urban gardens,
usually owned by now pension aged non weedkiller types. Succession and
a
lack of ''improvement'' along with a good dose of time does quite
rightly
enable a remarkable amount of Biodiversity within the urban context.
You
could almost guarantee seeing vulnerable wax caps in a pre 1940-1950's
lawn

As for the intensely managed agricultural setting, not only a
biological/ecological desert but also a carbon devoid soil.
Agricultural
practice will have contributed far more to atmospheric carbon than
every
car ever produced.

On Mon, Nov 15, 2021 at 6:24 PM Bill Anderson <
anderson.arb.original@xxxxxx.com> wrote:

Angus said: I'm deeply skeptical of the biodiversity value of a
private
garden lawn and indeed any landscaping put in place by commercial
housebuilders...

I'd say you were right to be sceptical Angus, but Sheffield
University
did
a study that showed domestic housing away from city centres had
better
biodiversity than intensely cultivated agricultural land. (Google
"biodiversity in urban gardens, bugs1 and bugs 2") However I suspect
it
takes some time for this sort of biodiversity to develop in back
gardens,
and I suspect the usual housebuilders' landscaping schemes are only a
step
in vaguely the right direction. I'm sick to the back teeth of
supermarket
car park type planting that features Cherry Laurel and other
allelopathic
plants that do very little to improve biodiversity. I'd rather see
new
developments with no landscaping and the new occupants actually
taking
an
interest. How you legislate for that I dunno.

I've not read the biodiversity net gain matrix thing yet but if it
doesn't
acknowledge that removing some plants is actually to improve
biodiversity
then there's something wrong with it.

Bill.



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The UKTC forum is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy and
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