UKTC Archive

RE: Swamp Cypress

Subject: RE: Swamp Cypress
From: Jim Quaife
Date: Nov 22 2021 18:12:38
In the winter of 1988 a 14m tall one was so weighed down with snow that its 
tip was almost touching the ground in a beautifully even curve.  The owner 
felt he had no option but to have it cut down although there was no rush as 
it looked so curious, and I agreed to do it.
He phoned me about 10 days or so afterwards and said that it was vertical 
again. I popped in and it was as if nothing had happened!
Jim

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info 
[mailto:uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info] On Behalf Of Mark Mackworth-Praed
Sent: 22 November 2021 17:57
To: UK Tree Care
Subject: RE: Swamp Cypress

Hello Oisin

Owen (Johnson) comments (Arboretum, p.202) that "one has never been known to 
blow down in Britain, but the timber is soft and uncannily light and they 
frequently shed portions of themselves in high winds". Mitchell and Lonsdale 
both say that Swamp Cypress is "remarkably disease-free" so rather like 
Jerry, I wonder if the branch shedding is a result of greater wind-exposure 
following the removal of the second stem, and not a sign of any disease as 
such.  

All the best
Mark MP

-----Original Message-----
From: uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info <uktc-request@xxxxxx.tree-care.info> 
On Behalf Of Oisin Kelly
Sent: 22 November 2021 12:35
To: UK Tree Care <uktc@xxxxxx.tree-care.info>
Subject: Swamp Cypress

Thoughts please.

I have been looking at a large swamp cypress (25m tall, 125cm DBH). It was 
previously twin stemmed, but one of the stems was truncated at 4m. 
Image attached.

In the past few years, it has shed several branches  - around 2 to 4m long, 
with basal diameter up to 150mm. After each occasion, I have inspected, but 
have not found any sign of disease, dysfunction that might alert one to 
further failures. I suspect, this may be something typical of the species and 
age. Does anyone have knowledge or experience of this? Also, any ideas on 
what pruning might be reasonably carried out to reduce the risk of branch 
failure - the short side branches do not seem to lend themselves to lateral 
reduction.

Thanks

-- 

Oisin



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The UKTC forum is supported by Bosky Trees arboricultural consultancy and
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